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4/23/2014 10:05 AMBrown Canyon Area ReopenedNew

(Posted April 23, 2014 at 10:05 a.am.)  Brown Canyon, located on the Sierra Vista Ranger District, Coronado National Forest has reopened.

The area was temporarily closed during the Brown Fire to allow for public safety from hazards associated with emergency fire suppression activity.

Visitors are reminded that a wildfire recently burned in the upper reaches of Scheelite Canyon below Ramsey Peak, and to use situational awareness and caution when hiking in the area.

For further information please contact the Sierra Vista Ranger District at (520) 378-0311.

(Source: Coronado National Forest)

Corondao National Forest, Brown Canyon, Brown Fire
4/22/2014 9:43 AMWildfire Information and Preparedness Meeting for Apache County ResidentsNew

(Posted April 22, 2014 at 9:40 a.m.) Local fire departments, the U.S Forest Service, Emergency Preparedness, Public Health, ADEQ and managers of the Hazardous Fuels Reduction Grant Program will present wildfire information and preparedness at the Eagar Town Hall on April 29, 2014 at 6 pm.

The main focus of the evening is the new Ready, Set, Go program, a tool to educate individuals on preparedness, situational awareness and safety. Developed as a three step process through a nation-wide discussion about how to protect homes and lives in the Wildland-Urban Interface, the Ready Set Go program helps increase your knowledge and ability to act safely during an emergency situation.

Other topics to be discussed include expected spring and summer weather conditions, fire season, fire restrictions, red flag warnings, and the Northeastern Arizona Public Information System. Managers of the Hazardous Fuels Reduction Grants Program will be discussing the benefits of the program and how to get signed up.

For current fire information, restrictions and red flag warnings visit www.311info.net, www.noaa.gov, www.fs.usda.gov/asnf and www.firerestrictions.us. You can also dial 311 or (928) 333-3412.  

Follow the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests on Twitter (@A_SNFs) for instant updates on fire restrictions, red flag warnings, prescribed fire and wildland fire.

(Source: Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests)

Eager Town Hall, Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests, Ready, Set, Go, Apache County
4/21/2014 2:17 PMFire Restrictions Announced for Bureau of Land Management

(Posted April 21, 2014, at 2:18 p.m.) To protect the public, natural resources, and reduce the risks of wildfires, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Colorado River District has announced fire restrictions on 5.4 million acres of public lands in western Arizona and southeastern California along the Colorado River.

 

Effective Friday, April 25, 2014, fire and smoking restrictions will be enforced on all public lands within the BLM Kingman, Lake Havasu, and Yuma Field Office jurisdictions.  These restrictions are similar to those being implemented in other areas in Arizona.

 

The BLM is asking the public to use extreme caution when visiting public lands this summer.  Currently there are no plans to close any areas to public use.  The public is reminded that the following acts are prohibited until further notice:

 

       Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire, charcoal, coal, or wood stove.  Campfires and charcoal are permitted in developed recreation sites or improved sites where agency-built fire rings or grills are provided.

 

       Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, within a developed or improved recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least six feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

 

       Welding or the use of any torch or metal cutting or gridding implement.

 

“Due to the drought conditions throughout the State, we have very dry vegetation in the area that will become fuel for wildfires as temperatures continue to rise and humidity falls,” stated Fire Management Officer Mike Trent.  The restrictions will continue until conditions warrant the lifting of the restrictions.”

 

Fireworks and incendiary devices are prohibited on Arizona public lands year-round.

 

Violations of these restrictions are punishable by a fine of not more than $1,000 and/or imprisonment of not more than 12 months. 

 

For fire restriction information in Arizona and New Mexico:

Call Toll Free:  1-877-864-6985

Visit the website:  http://www.firerestrictions.us/

 

(source: Bureau of Land Management)

Arizona, California, Colorado River, Kingman, Lake Havasu, Yuma
4/20/2014 1:21 PMOdonnell Fire Update: 65% contained

(Posted April 20, 2014 at 1:19 p.m.) The Odonnell Fire is located three miles southeast of Elgin. Arizona State Forestry reports the 600-acre fire is burning Catclaw, grass, and sacaton fire. The fire is 65% contained.

Crews began mop-up last night and will continue today, working along the perimeter line. Resources on the fire today include 2 engines, 2 type 2 crews (ASFD), and 1 water tender.

The fire is in unified command between Arizona State Forestry and Sonoita-Elgin Fire District. The fire will be handed back to the District command this afternoon at approximately 3:00pm.

Resources:

2 air attacks

7 engines

2 heavy airtankers

1 lead plane

2 single engine air tankers

2 type 1 crews (Gila IHC and Payson IHC)

1 type 1 helicopter

2 type 2 crews (ASFD)

1 type 2 helicopter

1 very large air tanker

1 water tender  

(Source: Cochise County Fire Department)

Odonnell Fire, Elgin, Santa Cruz County
4/19/2014 6:39 PMSanta Cruz County Fire Update

(Posted April 19, 2014 at 6:40 p.m.)The Odonell Canyon Fire was reported at 3:59 p.m. due to lightning strike. The Sonoita/Elgin  Fire Department is reporting that it is burning on Babacamari Ranch and moving fast now. It has reportedly doubled in size in the last hour and is now at an estimated 600 acres. The fire is being fought by members of Sonoita/Elgin Fire Department and air assets

This fire is in Santa Cruz County and the Sonoita/Elgin Fire Department will make additional releases.

(Source: Cochise County Fire Department)

Odonell Canyon Fire, Santa Cruz County, Sonita/Elgin Fire Department, Babacamari Rancg
4/19/2014 5:18 PMWildfire Reported Near Santa Cruz/Cochise County Line

(Posted on April 19, 2014 at 5:20 p.m.) Today a wildfire was reported near the Santa Cruz/Cochise County line on Bureau of Land Management and/or Fort Huachuca land and the cause is believed to be a lightning strike. The exact location has not been reported to the Sheriff's Office at this time.

More information will be released as it becomes available.

(Source: Cochise County Sheriff’s Office)

Wildfire, Santa Cruz County, Cochise County, Fort Huachuca, Bureau of Land Management
4/19/2014 12:43 PMRamsey Canyon Preserve Access Open to Canyon Bottom

(Posted April 19, 2014 at 12:45 p.m.)Ramsey Canyon Preserve has reopened ahead of schedule today April 19. Access is currently limited to the canyon bottom only. Hamburg Trail into the Coronado NF and upper Ramsey is closed until Monday.

For more information please visit http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/arizona/placesweprotect/ramsey-canyon-preserve.xml

(Source: Cochise County Sheriff’s Office)

Cochise County, Brown Fire, Ramsey Canyon
4/19/2014 6:29 AMBrown Fire Final Update

(Posted April 19, 2014 at 6:29 a.m.) This will be the final update for the Brown fire. On Friday, hotshot crews were able to complete a direct handline around the perimeter of the fire with 75% containment completed.  Helicopters continued to provide fire suppression support for the firefighters. All crews were flown off the fire in the early afternoon in advance of the approaching thunderstorms.

 The plan for Saturday is for hotshot crews will continue direct handline improvement along the perimeter of the fire.  Firefighters are continuing contingency actions outside of the current fire area in the event direct attack is unsuccessful.  Helicopters will continue to provide fire suppression support for firefighters. Tomorrows actions will be contingent upon the weather.  

Fire Summary:

Start Date: April 13, 2014

Cause: Human

Size: 240 acres, 232 acres on U.S. Army Fort Huachuca, 8 acres on the Coronado National Forest

Containment: 75%

Location: Approximately 5 miles SW of Sierra Vista, AZ, the upper elevations of Scheelite Canyon, below Ramsey Peak

Terrain: Steep and rugged, creeping and smoldering in the upper timber vegetation

Weather: Rain fell on the fire area along with gusty erratic outflow winds. Forecast for April 19 include a 30-40% chance of showers and thunderstorms.

Threats: No structures are threatened at this time

Evacuations:  None. The Pre-Evacuation rollout which was initiated in the Ramsey Canyon area on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week has been halted

Resources:  Approximately 293 resources remain on the incident: Four hotshot crews, excess contingency engines and overhead staff were released today.  As the fire activity decreases, the Type 1 Incident Management Team will transition to a Type 3 Incident Management Team on Sunday evening. As resources are being released from the fire, we are encouraging the public to be especially aware of the extra traffic while driving in the area.

Closure:  Coronado National Forest Brown Canyon is temporarily closed for public safety during fire suppression.  For more information visit http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/3834/21811/.

The Nature Conservancy’s Ramsey Canyon Preserve will reopen Sunday April 20. Brown Fire operations are winding down but crews will still be assigned to the area. The preserve is open 8 am – 5 pm Thursday through Monday—we are closed every Tuesday and Wednesday.

http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/arizona/placesweprotect/ramsey-canyon-preserve.xml

Incident Commander Clay Templin and the entire Southwest Area Incident Management Team would like to express our sincere gratitude to the local communities and cooperators for your support during the Brown Fire. 

Further information is available at the following: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov

Call Center (8am – 5pm): 877-512-8014

(Source: Inciweb)

Brown Fire, Coronado National Forest, Fort Huachuca, Sierra Vista
4/18/2014 8:33 PMThe Nature Conservancy’s Ramsey Canyon Preserve Will Reopen Sunday
(Posted on April 18, 2014 at 8:34 p.m.) The Nature Conservancy’s Ramsey Canyon Preserve will reopen Sunday, April 20. Brown Fire operations are winding down but crews will still be assigned to the area. The preserve is open 8 am – 5 pm Thursday through Monday—they are closed every Tuesday and Wednesday.

The fire did not enter Ramsey Canyon though it lies within the bigger area of possible spread. There may be hot spots lingering at the site of the fire in a remote area on Fort Huachuca until our summer rains arrive. The Hamburg Trail which starts on the preserve and climbs into the Coronado National Forest will remain closed until forest trails reopen likely early this coming week.

The preserve offers guided walks every Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 9 a.m. Three sessions of summer “All Hands on Earth” camp for kids are scheduled for July. Call 520-378-2785 for more information about Ramsey Canyon Preserve and dial extension 116 for more information about the camp.

(Source: Cochise County Sheriff’s Office)
Brown Fire, Ramsey Canyon, Nature Conservancy, Fort Huachuca, Coronado National Forest
4/18/2014 2:30 PMBrown Fire Update: Air Quality

(Posted April 18, 2014 at 2:32 p.m.) There are minimal impacts to air quality given limited fire growth over the past day, wind dispersion, and possible precipitation expected today/tomorrow.

 A community meeting will held today at 7:00 p.m. at the Sierra Vista Fire Station #363 at 675 Giulio Cesare Ave. in Sierra Vista.

On Thursday, hotshot crews completed a direct handline around the perimeter of the fire with 25% containment completed along the southwest flank. Helicopters continued to provide fire suppression support for the firefighters.

As of 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 17th, the Brown Fire call center has been shut down. All Brown Fire information phone calls will now be taken at the Incident Command Post. The old numbers are no longer in service. For information regarding the Brown Fire please call 877-512-8014.

For detailed fire information, visit the Incident Management System (InciWeb). For up-to-date monitoring information for particulate matter, visit ADEQ's Web page for Portable Particulate Monitors, http://www.phoenixvis.net/PPMmain.aspx

(Source: Cochise County Sheriff’s Office)

Brown Fire, Air Quality, Cochise County, Sierra Vista
4/18/2014 2:19 PMBrown Fire Cochise County Sheriff's Office Update

(Posted on April 18, 2014, 2:21 p.m.)  The Pre-Evacuation rollout which was initiated in the Ramsey Canyon area on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week has been halted. All residents are advised that the anticipation surrounding the spread of the Brown Fire was, fortunately, not realized and the entire evacuation scenario was not fulfilled.

The Cochise County Sheriff’s Office is continuing to work closely with local, state, and federal fire officials until the Brown Fire is at 100% containment, however, there is no expectation that this fire will require an evacuation process.

Sheriff Mark Dannels said today, "The cooperation between all public safety agencies, regardless of their mission, was evident in the approach to simultaneously handling a major wildfire and the safety of our citizens. We give our heartfelt thanks to the patience of the public and to the stakeholders in this process. Please remember that our wildfire season is here, and has started off with a roar, so be cautious with any open flame or incendiary source. We have Cochise County's beauty at hand 365 days each year so we all need to work together in preserving it for generations to come."

(Source: Cochise County Sheriff’s Office)

Brown Fire, Cochise County Sherriff's Office
4/18/2014 9:58 AMBrown Fire Update: Direct handline around fire complete

(Posted April 18, 2014 at 10:02 a.m.) On Thursday, the hotshot crews were able to complete a direct handline around the perimeter of the fire with 25% containment completed along the southwest flank.  Helicopters continued to provide fire suppression support for the firefighters.

A public meeting was held at the Sierra Vista Fire Station #363 at 7:00 pm with approximately 20 people in attendance.

Plans for Friday:

Minimal fire growth is expected.  Hotshot crews will continue direct handline improvement along the perimeter of the fire.  Firefighters are continuing contingency actions outside of the current fire area in the event direct attack is unsuccessful.  Helicopters will continue to provide fire suppression support for firefighters.   

Fire Summary:

Start Date:  April 13, 2014

Cause: Human

Size:  240 acres, 232 acres on U.S. Army Fort Huachuca, 8 acres on the Coronado National Forest

Containment: 25%

Location:  Approximately 5 miles SW of Sierra Vista, AZ, the upper elevations of Scheelite Canyon, below Ramsey Peak

Terrain:  Steep and rugged, creeping and smoldering in the upper timber vegetation

Weather: Slight chance of moisture and thunderstorms with the possibility of strong thunderstorm outflow and dry lightning.  Higher humidities and cooler temperatures will minimize fire movement

Threats: No structures are threatened at this time

Evacuations:  None. The Sheriff's Office and Sierra Vista Police Department have been working door to door in Ramsey Canyon to leave informational notices to homes where no contact was made. They are utilizing this method of contact to advise residents to be prepared in the event an evacuation is instituted. For more information please visit https://www.facebook.com/CochiseSO


Resources:  Approximately 408 personnel include:

·         7 interagency hotshot crews                          

·         2 Type 2 handcrews

·         1 Type 2 initial attack crew                            

·         2 Type 1 heavy helicopters

·         3 Type 2 medium helicopters                        

·         3 Type 3 medium helicopters

·         2 Type 3 engines                                           

·         7 Type 6 engines

·         AZ DPS helicopter (medevac)                      

·         2 water tenders

·         Miscellaneous overhead                                

·         Air Tankers are available if needed

A limited amount of crews and equipment will begin being released from the incident starting today.  As the fire activity decreases, the Type 1 Incident Management Team will transition to a Type 3 Incident Management Team on Sunday evening.

Closure:  Coronado National Forest Brown Canyon is temporarily closed for public safety during fire suppression.  For more information visit http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/3834/21811/.

Closure:  Ramsey Canyon Preserve Is Closed until Further Notice due to fire personnel working in the area. For more information, visit http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/arizona/placesweprotect/ramsey-canyon-preserve.xml

(Source: inciweb)

 

 

 

 

Brown Fire, Coronado National Forest, Sierra Vista, Fort Huachuca
4/18/2014 8:29 AMState Forester Issues Fire Restrictions

(Posted April 18, 2014 at 8:31 a.m.) Due to the increased risk of wildfire in the State of Arizona, State Forester Scott Hunt announced today that the Arizona State Forestry Division will be implementing fire restrictions on State-owned and State-managed lands. The restrictions are effective April 18, 2014 at noon and will continue until further notice.

Fire restrictions are necessary due to existing very high fire danger to prevent human-caused wildfires and protect public health and safety. Contributing factors include high temperatures, low humidity, and persistently dry vegetation that provide conditions for rapid spread of wildfire.

“The State has seen an increase in the number of wildfires in the last few weeks, with most being human-caused,” said State Forester Scott Hunt. “Implementing fire restrictions will reduce the threat of wildfire to communities and to natural resources; Arizona residents can do their part in preventing human-caused fires by following the fire restrictions guidelines for State-owned and State-managed lands.”

These fire restrictions cover all unincorporated State-owned and State-managed lands south of the Grand Canyon, including all State Trust lands, all Game and Fish Wildlife Areas, all Arizona State Parks (State Parks will remain open with campfires allowed in developed campgrounds; please visit http://azstateparks.com for more information), and all Department of Transportation highway right-of-way property not owned by Federal land management agencies. State lands north of the Grand Canyon are not included in fire restrictions at this time.

The restrictions are as follows:

·         Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire, charcoal, coal, or wood stove other than in a developed campsite or picnic area is prohibited. Exemptions include persons using a device solely fueled by liquid petroleum or LPG fuels that can be turned on and off.

·         Smoking is prohibited unless: it is within an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site/improved site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

·         The discharging or using of any kind of fireworks and incendiary devices is prohibited.

·         Welding or operating acetylene or other torch device with an open flame is prohibited.

Additional exemptions to the above-listed restrictions include:

·         Any Federal, State, or local officer or member of an organized rescue or firefighting force in the performance of an official duty.

·         All land within a city boundary is exempted unless otherwise stated in city ordinance.

If local authorities have imposed stronger restrictions than those listed above, then the local restrictions shall apply. These restrictions do not apply to private lands.

For more information regarding fire restrictions, please visit the fire restrictions website at http://firerestrictions.us/az. Additional information about the Arizona State Forestry Division and the Notice of Fire Restrictions may be found at http://www.azsf.gov.

These restrictions are effective April 18, 2014 and will continue until rescinded.

(Source: Arizona State Forestry; firerestrictions.us)

 

Arizona State Forestry, Fire Restrictions, Wildfire
4/18/2014 5:51 AMBrown Fire Update: No change in acreage, Friday plans

(Posted April 18, 2014 at 5:53 a.m.) The Brown Fire continued creeping and smoldering, Thursday, April 17th, within the perimeter of the fire.  Firefighters completed hand line around the entire fire today.  There was no change in acreage Thursday.  The use of  helicopters dropping water was effective in assisting ground forces.  Smoke became more visible as firefighters completed a small (1-2 acre) burnout to clean up an interior unburned island. 

Contingency line preparation continued in Sawmill Canyon to the west of the fire and Ramsey Canyon to the east of the fire. Firefighters also conducted structural assessments in the Ramsey Canyon area.

A public meeting was held at the Sierra Vista City Fire Department at 7:00 pm with low attendance. Sierra Vista Fire Department will be lead agency for hosting future meetings.

Plans for Friday:

Once again, minimal fire growth is expected.  Hotshot crews will continue direct hand line reinforcement around the fire and expand their mop-up efforts.  Firefighters are continuing contingency actions outside of the current fire area.  Helicopters continue to be available and can provide suppression support for firefighters if needed.   

Evacuations:  None. The Sheriff's Office and Sierra Vista Police Department have been working door to door in Ramsey Canyon to leave informational notices to homes where no contact was made. They are utilizing this method of contact to advise residents to be prepared in the event an evacuation is instituted. For more information please visit https://www.facebook.com/CochiseSO

Start Date:      April 13, 2014

Cause:            Human

Size:               240 acres, 232 acres on U.S. Army Fort Huachuca, 8 acres on the Coronado                                National Forest

Containment: 25%

Location:        Approximately 5 miles SW of Sierra Vista, AZ, the upper elevations of                                            Scheelite Canyon, below Ramsey Peak

Terrain:          Steep and rugged burning in the upper elevations in brush and timber                                             vegetation

Weather:        Low forecasted humidities of 7-10% and wind gusts to 20 mph are                                                  predicted in the afternoon

Threats:         No structures are threatened at this time

 


Resources:  Approximately 408 personnel include:

·         7 interagency hotshot crews                          

·         2 Type 2 handcrews

·         1 Type 2 initial attack crew                            

·         2 Type 1 heavy helicopters

·         3 Type 2 medium helicopters                        

·         3 Type 3 medium helicopters

·         2 Type 3 engines                                           

·         7 Type 6 engines

·         AZ DPS helicopter (medevac)                      

·         2 water tenders

·         Miscellaneous overhead                                

·         Air Tankers are available if needed

Closure:  Coronado National Forest Brown Canyon is temporarily closed for public safety during fire suppression.  For more information visit http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/3834/21811/.

Closure:  Ramsey Canyon Preserve Is Closed until Further Notice due to fire personnel working in the area. For more information, visit http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/arizona/placesweprotect/ramsey-canyon-preserve.xml

(Source: inciweb)

Brown Fire, Coronado National Forest, Fort Huachuca, Sierra Vista
4/17/2014 7:23 PMBrown Fire Update: Call Center Closed

(Posted on April 17, 2014 at 7:25 p.m.) Please note as of 5pm this evening April 17 the Brown Fire call center has been shut down. All Brown Fire information phone calls will now be taken at the Incident Command Post. The old numbers are no longer in service. For information regarding the Brown Fire please call 877-512-8014.

(Source: inciweb)

Brown Fire, Sierra Vista, Fort Huachuca, Coronado National Forest
4/17/2014 6:09 PMBrown Fire Update: Interior smoke visible this afternoon

(Posted on April 17, 6:11 p.m.) Residents may see increased smoke activity this evening. SWAIMT confirmed that smoke is from unburned fuel inside the fire line. Ample resources remain assigned to the Brown Fire as a precaution. The increased activity is well within the established fire lines.

(Source: inciweb)

Brown Fire, Sierra Vista, Fort Huachuca, Coronado National Forest
4/17/2014 1:24 PMBrown Fire Update: Handline construction continues

(Posted on April 17, 1:26 p.m.) The Brown Fire continues to burn approximately 5 miles SW of Sierra Vista, Arizona the upper elevations of Scheelite Canyon below Ramsey Peak. The terrain is steep and rugged with the fire burning in the upper elevations in brush and timber vegetation. No structures are threatened at this time.

Wednesday's Activity:

Low humidities and gusty erratic winds occurred on the fire area. Low fire behavior with some areas of creeping and smoldering fire were observed. Firefighters made progress building direct fireline on the east and west flanks of the fire however containment will not occur until firefighters are confident the lines will hold. The forward spread of the fire has been stopped. Use of retardant and water from the helicopter was effective in assisting ground forces. Contingency line preparation continued in Sawmill Canyon to the west of the fire and Ramsey Canyon to the east of the fire. Firefighters conducted structural assessments in the Ramsey Canyon area.

A public meeting was held at the Sierra Vista City Council Chamber at 7:00 pm with approximately 40 people in attendance. A recording of the April 16 community meeting will be available online at http://www.sierravistaaz.gov/.

Plans for Thursday:

Minimal fire growth is expected. Hotshot crews will continue direct handline construction on the west and east flanks of the fire. Firefighters are continuing contingency actions outside of the current fire area in the event direct attack is unsuccessful. Helicopters will continue to provide fire suppression support for firefighters.

There will be a community meeting tonight at 7 p.m. at the Sierra Vista Fire Station #363, 675 Giulio Cesare Ave., in Sierra Vista.

Evacuations: None. The Sheriff's Office and Sierra Vista Police Department have been working door to door in Ramsey Canyon to leave informational notices to homes where no contact was made. They are utilizing this method of contact to advise residents to be prepared in the event an evacuation is instituted. For more information please visit https://www.facebook.com/CochiseSO

Brown Fire Summary:

Size: 240 acres 232 acres on U.S. Army Fort Huachuca 8 acres on the Coronado National Forest

Containment: 0%

Start Date: April 13 2014

Cause: Human

Weather: Low forecasted humidities of 7-10% and wind gusts to 20 mph are predicted in the afternoon

Resources: Approximately 408 personnel include:

·         7 interagency hotshot crews 2 Type 2 handcrews

·         1 Type 2 initial attack crew 2 Type 1 heavy helicopters

·         3 Type 2 medium helicopters 3 Type 3 medium helicopters

·         2 Type 3 engines 7 Type 6 engines

·         AZ DPS helicopter (medevac) 2 water tenders

·         Miscellaneous overhead Air Tankers are available if needed

Closure: Coronado National Forest Brown Canyon is temporarily closed for public safety during fire suppression. For more information visit http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/3834/21811/.

Closure: Ramsey Canyon Preserve Is Closed until Further Notice due to fire personnel working in the area. For more information visit http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/arizona/placesweprotect/ramsey-canyon-preserve.xml

Call Center: 520-439-2333 or 1-800-288-3861

(Source: inciweb)

 

Brown Fire, Sierra Vista, Fort Huachuca, Ramsey Canyon, Coronado National Forest
4/17/2014 5:24 AMBrown Fire Wednesday night Update

 (Posted April 17, 5:26 a.m.) The Brown Fire is located in a bowl in the upper elevations of Scheelite Canyon. It is approximately 5 miles SW of Sierra Vista, AZ. It started on U.S. Army Fort Huachuca on April 13 and burned onto the Coronado National Forest at approximately 11am on April 14.  The fire is burning at the upper elevations in brush and timber in steep rugged terrain. 

The fire objectives are to fully suppress the fire and protect identified values, including Fort Huachuca Military Reservation, private property, public lands, and associated infrastructure.  Minimize or eliminate impacts to cultural sites, wilderness, sensitive wildlife habitat, and watershed values.

Size: 240 ac (reduction in acreage due to better mapping from yesterday’s infrared flight)       

Containment: 0%

Threats: No structures are threatened at this time.  

Evacuations: None. The Sheriff's Office and Sierra Vista Police Department have been working door to door in Ramsey Canyon to leave informational notices to homes where no contact was made. They are utilizing this method of contact to advise residents to be prepared in the event that an evacuation is instituted. For more information please visit https://www.facebook.com/CochiseSO

Coronado National Forest Closure: Brown Canyon is temporarily closed for public safety during fire suppression.  For more information visit http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/3834/21811/

Ramsey Canyon Preserve Is Closed Until Further Notice due to fire personnel working in the area. For more information, visit http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/unitedstates/arizona/placesweprotect/ramsey-canyon-preserve.xml

Wednesday's Activity:

Low humidities and gusty erratic winds occurred on the fire area.  Low fire behavior, with some areas of creeping and smoldering fire, were observed. Firefighters continued to build direct fireline on the east and west flanks of the fire. Contingency line preparation continues in Sawmill Canyon to the west of the fire and Ramsey Canyon to the east of the fire. Firefighters are conducting structural assessments in the Ramsey Canyon area. A public meeting was held at the Sierra Vista Ranger Station at 7pm with approximately 30 people in attendance. A recording of the April 16 community meeting will available online at http://www.sierravistaaz.gov/ mid-morning Thursday.

Plans for Thursday:

Minimal fire growth is expected.  Hotshot crews will continue direct handline construction on the west and east flanks of the fire.  Firefighters are continuing contingency actions outside of the current fire area in the event direct attack is unsuccessful.  Aviation resources will continue to provide fire suppression support for firefighters.  A community meeting is tentatively planned for April 17 at 7pm.  The location has not yet been confirmed.  Details will be posted on http://inciweb.nwcg.gov as soon as they are available.

Weather: Low forecasted humidites of -10% and wind gusts to 20 mph in the afternoon are predicted in the afternoon.

Resources: Approximately 408 personnel are assigned including:

·         7 interagency hotshot crews

·         2 Type 2 handcrews

·         1 Type 2 initial attack crew

·         2 Type 1 heavy helicopters

·         3 Type 2 medium helicopters

·         3 Type 3 medium helicopters

·         2 Type 3 engines

·         7 Type 6 engines

·         AZ DPS helicopter (medevac)

·         2 water tenders

·         Miscellaneous overhead

Available Aircraft:

·         2 Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs)

·         2 P2V air tankers

·         2 Air Attack

Call Center (8am – 5pm): 520-439-2333 or 1-800-288-3861

(Source: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov)

Brown Fire, Sierra Vista
4/16/2014 4:49 PMApache-Sitgreaves National Forests’ to Implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions

(Posted April 16, 2014, at 4:52 p.m.) Campfire and smoking restrictions will be implemented at 8 a.m. Tuesday, April 22, on the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests in order to protect public health and reduce preventable human-caused fires. 

 

Under stage 1 fire restrictions, fires, campfires, charcoal, coal and wood stoves are allowed in developed campgrounds only. Devices solely fueled by liquid petroleum or LPG fuels that can be turned on and off are allowed within an area that is cleared of flammable materials within three feet of the device.

 

The restrictions also limit smoking to within enclosed vehicles, buildings, developed campgrounds or while in an area that is cleared of all flammable material at least three feet in diameter. Fireworks and incendiary devices are always prohibited on all national forest lands.

 

Implementation of fire restrictions is especially important this year given the dry winter and impacts of long-term drought on the forests. Criteria used to determine when to implement fire restrictions include current and predicted weather, fuel moisture, fire activity levels and available firefighting resources. Fire restrictions will remain in effect until the forests receive significant precipitation. 

 

To report a fire, call 911.

 

Know Before You Go!  Obtain additional fire information via the following:

·         Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests http://www.fs.usda.gov/asnf

·         Northeastern Arizona Public Information System http://311info.net/ or call 311 or 928-333-3412

·         Arizona Fire Restrictions http://firerestrictions.us/az/

·         Arizona Fire Prevention & Information (fire restrictions & red flag alerts) http://wildlandfire.az.gov/ 

 

(source: Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests)

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests, fire restrictions,
4/16/2014 1:51 PMBrown Fire Update: April 16 Community Meeting

(Posted April 16, 2014, at 1:53 p.m.) A community meeting regarding the Brown Fire will take place tonight beginning at 7 p.m. at the Sierra Vista City Council Chambers at City Hall. The address is 1011 N. Coronado, in Sierra Vista.

 

Seating is limited.

 

The meeting will also be broadcast on Channel 12.

 

(Source: Inciweb)

Brown Fire, Sierra Vista, Wildfire
4/16/2014 8:16 AMCrews to Continue to Build Fireline on Flanks of Brown Fire Today

(Posted April 16, 2014, at 8:18 a.m.)The Brown Fire started on U.S. Army Fort Huachuca on April 13 and burned onto the Coronado National Forest at approximately 11 a.m. on April 14.

 

Plans for Today:

Firefighters will continue to scout contingency lines and go direct building fireline on the east and west flanks of the fire.

 

Fire personnel will also scout contingency lines in Sawmill Canyon to the west of the fire and Ramsey Canyon to the east of the fire. Firefighters will conduct structural assessments in the Ramsey Canyon area.

 

A Brown Fire Information Call Center will be staffed from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. beginning today. The phone number is 520-439-2333 or 1-800-288-3861.

Evacuations: 

None. The Sheriff's Office and Police Department will continue working door-to-door in Ramsey Canyon tomorrow to leave informational notices to homes where no contact was made today. We are utilizing this method of contact to advise residents to be prepared in the event that an evacuation is instituted.

 

Remember to gather important items listed and be prepared to leave at a moments notice. The Sheriff's Office and Police Department will continue working door to door in Ramsey Canyon tomorrow to leave informational notices to homes where no contact was made today. We are utilizing this method of contact to advise residents to be prepared in the event that an evacuation is instituted. Remember to gather important items listed and be prepared to leave at a moments notice. For more information please visit https://www.facebook.com/CochiseSO

 

Closures:

Brown Canyon temporarily closed for public safety during fire suppression. For more information visit http://inciweb.nwcg.gov.

 

Tuesday's Activity:

Three hotshot crews anchored the fire and began constructing fireline on the southeast and southwest flanks of the fire. Firefighters also scouted contingency lines. Air tankers and helicopters continued to drop retardant and water on the fire to try to minimize the fire's spread. Aircraft began utilizing the tanker base at Libby Field with the exception of the DC-10 VLAT which is based out of Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport.

 

Clay Templin's Type-1 Southwest Incident Management Team assumed command of the fire Tuesday at 6 p.m. A public meeting was held at the Sierra Vista Ranger Station at 7 p.m. with approximately 75 people in attendance.

 

Brown Fire summary:

Size: approximately 366 acres

Containment: 0%

Growth Potential: moderate

Fire Behavior: Active fire. Short runs. Isolated torching with short range spotting.

Threats: No structures are threatened at this time.

Resources: Approximately 240 personnel are assigned including:

·         5 hotshot crews (Ironwood Silver City Gila Payson and Ironwood IHCs

·         Coronado NF crew 5 short crew

·         2 Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs)

·         2 P2V air tankers

·         2 Type 3 helicopters

·         1 Type 2 helicopter (2 Type 2 helicopter enroute)

·         2 Type 1 helicopters

·         2 Air Attack

·         A DPS helicopter is available for medevac if needed

·         Miscellaneous fire engines (crews supporting suppression efforts)

·         Miscellaneous overhead

Fuels: The fire is burning at the upper elevations in brush and timber.

Terrain: steep rugged inaccessible terrain.

Weather: The Fire Weather Watch initially forecasted for Wednesday has been downgraded. Breezy southwest winds are anticipated. Lightning is possible later in the week.

 

(source: Coronado National Forest/Inciweb)

Brown Fire, Fort Huachuca, Coronado National forest, Ramsey Canyon, Sawmill Canyon
4/16/2014 5:59 AMBrown Fire Update: Information Call Center opens Wednesday

(Posted April 16 at 6:00 a.m.) The Brown Fire started on U.S. Army Fort Huachuca on April 13 and burned onto the Coronado National Forest at approximately 11am on April 14.

Tuesday's activities:

Three hotshot crews anchored the fire and began constructing fireline on the east and west flanks of the fire. Firefighters also scouted contingency lines. Airtankers and helicopters continued to drop retardant and water on the fire to try to minimize the fire's spread. Aircraft began utilizing the tanker base at Libby Field with the exception of the DC-10 VLAT which is based out of Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport. Clay Templin's Type 1 Southwest Incident Management Team assumed command of the fire Tuesday at 6pm. A public meeting was held at the Sierra Vista Ranger Station at 7pm.

Wednesday activities:

Firefighters will continue to scout contingency lines and go direct building fireline on the east and west flanks of the fire. Fire personnel will also scout contingency lines in Sawmill Canyon to the west of the fire and Ramsey Canyon to the east of the fire. Firefighters will be conducting structural assessments in the Ramsey Canyon area.

An information call center opens Wednesday at 8 a.m.. It will be staffed from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Please call 520-439-2333 or 1-800-288-3861

Fire Summary:

·         Size: approximately 366 acres

·         Containment: 0%

·         Growth Potential: moderate

·         Fire Behavior: Active fire. Short runs. Isolated torching with short range spotting.

·         Threats: No structures are threatened at this time.

·         Objective: Full Suppression; Limit the fire's spread

·         Fuels: The fire is burning at the upper elevations in brush and timber.

·         Terrain: steep rugged inaccessible terrain.

·         Weather: The Fire Weather Watch initially forecasted for Wednesday has been downgraded. Breezy southwest winds are anticipated. Lightning is possible later in the week.

·         Resources: Approximately 240 personnel are assigned including:5 hotshot crews (Ironwood Silver City Gila Payson and Ironwood IHCs;Coronado NF crew 5 short crew; 2 Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs); 2 P2V air tankers; 1 Very Large Air Tanker (VLAT); 2 Type 3 helicopters; 1 Type 2 helicopter (2 Type 2 helicopter enroute); 2 Type 1 helicopters; 2 Air Attack; A DPS helicopter is available for medevac if needed; Miscellaneous fire engines (crews supporting suppression efforts); Miscellaneous overhead

(Source: Coronado National Forest)

Coronado National Forest, Sierra Vista, Brown Fire, Fort Huachuca
4/15/2014 2:59 PMBrown Fire Update: Fire Officials Plan Public Meeting

(Posted April 15, 2014, at 3:01 p.m.) Firefighters from three hotshot crews are constructing fireline on the Brown Fire.

 

Air tankers and helicopters are dropping fire retardant and water to limit fire spread and support ground operations.

 

A public meeting regarding the Brown Fire will take place tonight beginning at 7 p.m. at the Sierra Vista Ranger District Office, 4070 S. Avenida Saracino, in Hereford, Ariz.

 

(source: Inciweb)

Brown Fire, Hereford,
4/15/2014 2:26 PMBrown Canyon Area Temporarily Closed

(Posted April 15, 2014, at 2:28 p.m.) A portion of the Sierra Vista Ranger District, Coronado National Forest, will be temporarily closed in the vicinity of the Brown Fire.

 

During the closure the following activities are prohibited: 

·        Entering or using Brown Canyon Area west and areas northwest of Ramsey Canyon.

·        Being on Forest Service Road 5736, and Brown Canyon Ranch Road, Forest Service Trail  115, 116, 117, 122, 123,129, 103 and trails therein. 

 

Brown Fire Emergency Closure map

 

The purpose of the closure is to allow for public safety from hazards associated with emergency fire suppression activity on the Brown Fire.

 

The area will remain closed until May 1, 2014, or until the order is rescinded, whichever is earlier. 

 

Any violation of these prohibitions is punishable by a fine of not more than $5,000.00 for individuals, $10,000.00 for organizations and/or imprisonment for not more than six months.

 

For further information please contact the Sierra Vista Ranger District at (520) 378-0311.

 

(source: Coronado National Forest)

Brown Fire, Coronado National Forest, Sierra Vista Ranger District, wildfire, Ramsey Canyon
4/15/2014 2:01 PMFire Restrictions to Begin Friday on Four Arizona National Forests

(Posted April 15, 2014, at 2:03 p.m.) Campfire and smoking restrictions will be implemented at 8 a.m. on Friday, April 18, on the Coconino, Kaibab, Prescott and Tonto national forests in order to protect public health and reduce preventable human-caused fires. 

 

On the Kaibab National Forest, restrictions will apply only to the Williams and Tusayan Ranger Districts. Fire restrictions will not yet be implemented on the North Kaibab Ranger District due to different weather and fuels conditions.

 

Under the restrictions, fires, campfires, charcoal, coal and wood stoves are allowed in developed campgrounds only. The restrictions also limit smoking to within enclosed vehicles or buildings or in developed campgrounds.

 

Using a device that is solely fueled by liquid petroleum or LPG fuels that can be turned on and off is allowed in areas that are clear of flammable materials. Fireworks are always prohibited on all national forest lands.

 

On the Prescott National Forest, campfires are not allowed at the designated dispersed sites within the Prescott Basin. Metal posts identify designated dispersed sites with a number.

 

Implementation of fire restrictions is especially important this year given the dry winter and impacts of long-term drought on the forests. Criteria used to determine when to implement fire restrictions include current and predicted weather, fuel moisture, fire activity levels and available firefighting resources. Fire restrictions will remain in effect until the forests receive significant precipitation. 

 

“We are seeing conditions on the forests that warrant going into fire restrictions earlier than usual,” said Coconino National Forest Supervisor Earl Stewart.  “We could have a long fire season ahead of us, and we need members of the public to work with us to prevent human-caused starts.”

 

Know Before You Go! The public can obtain additional fire information via the following:

·         Arizona Fire Restrictions http://firerestrictions.us/az/  

·         Arizona Fire Prevention & Information (fire restrictions & red flag alerts) http://wildlandfire.az.gov/ 

·         Fire Restrictions on Public Lands in Arizona and New Mexico, 1-877-864-6985

 

(source: Coconino National Forest, Kaibab National Forest, Prescott National Forest, Tonto National Forest)

Coconino, Kaibab, Prescott, Tonto, fire restrictions
4/15/2014 11:47 AMBrown Fire Update: Firefighters and air tankers working to minimize spread

(Posted on April 15, 2014 at 11:50 a.m.)  The Brown Fire started on U.S. Army Fort Huachuca on April 13 and burned onto the Coronado National Forest at approximately 11am on April 14. The fire is burning in a bowl at the top of Sheelite Canyon. The fire is burning at the upper elevations in brush and timber with no structures threatened at this time.

 

Tuesday’ Activity:

Firefighters are being shuttled to the fire by helicopter where they will construct fireline. Air tankers will drop fire retardant and helicopters will drop buckets of water on the fire to minimize the fire’s spread and support firefighter’s efforts.

 

Clay Templin's Type 1 Southwest Incident Management Team has been ordered. Transfer of command will occur Tuesday at 6pm

 

Fire Summary

·        Size: approximately 366 acres

·        Containment: 0%

·        Growth Potential: moderate

·        Fire Behavior: Active fire. Short runs. Isolated torching with short range spotting.

·        Threats: No structures are threatened at this time.

·        Objective: Full Suppression; Limit the fire's spread

·        Fuels: The fire is burning at the upper elevations in brush and timber.

·        Terrain: steep rugged inaccessible terrain.

·        Weather: A Fire Weather Watch is predicted on Wednesday. Low humidity and high winds combined with drought conditions will result in unfavorable conditions.

·        Resources: Approximately 240 personnel are assigned including:

o   5 hotshot crews on scene - Ironwood IHC, Silver City IHC, Mesa IHC, Prescott IHC & Gila IHC

o   Coronado NF crew 5 short crew & Arizona State Forestry Division Ft. Grant crew

o   2 Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs)

o   2 P2V air tankers

o   1 Very Large Air Tanker/DC 10 (VLAT)

o   1 Type 3 helicopter

o   1 Type 2 helicopter

o   (1 one Type 1 helicopter enroute, 1 Type 3 helicopter ordered & 3 Type 2 helicopters ordered)

o   Miscellaneous 1 Type 3 engine, 2 Type 6 engines, and 2 water tenders

o   Miscellaneous overhead

 

(Source:  Coronado National Forest)

Coronado National Forest, Brown Fire
4/14/2014 10:05 PMBrown Fire Update; Type 1 Incident Management Team Ordered

(Posted on April 14, 2014 at 10:05 p.m.)  The Brown Fire started on U.S. Army Fort Huachuca on April 13 and burned onto the Coronado National Forest at approximately 11am on April 14.

 

Monday's Activity:

Airtankers have been dropping retardant and helicopters have been dropping buckets of water on the fire to try to minimze the fire's spread.Division Supervisors and Crew Supervisors continue to asses the fire to determine the best strategy.

 

Plans for Tuesday:

Scouting handline construction contingencies utilizing aviation for crew shuttles and continued use of helicopters and air tankers to drop water and retardant.

 

Clay Templin's Type 1 Southwest Incident Management Team has been ordered. Transfer of command will occur Tuesday at 6pm

 

Fire Summary

·        Size: approximately 366 acres

·        Containment: 0%

·        Growth Potential: moderate

·        Fire Behavior: Active fire. Short runs. Isolated torching with short range spotting.

·        Threats: No structures are threatened at this time.

·        Objective: Full Suppression; Limit the fire's spread

·        Fuels: The fire is burning at the upper elevations in brush and timber.

·        Terrain: steep rugged inaccessible terrain.

·        Weather: A Fire Weather Watch is predicted on Tuesday. Low humidity and high winds combined with drought conditions will result in unfavorable conditions.

·        Resources: Approximately 160 personnel are assigned including:

o   2 hotshot crews on scene - Ironwood IHC & Silver City IHC (3 additional hotshot crews enroute)

o   Coronado NF crew 5 short crew

o   2 Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs)

o   2 P2V air tankers

o   1 Very Large Air Tanker (VLAT)

o   1 Type 3 helicopter

o   1 Type 2 helicopter

o   (1 one Type 1 helicopter enroute)

o   Miscellaneous fire engines (crews supporting suppression efforts)

o   Miscellaneous overhead

 

(Source:  Coronado National Forest)

Coronado National Forest, Brown Fire
4/14/2014 5:20 PMBrown Fire Update: Air Support Workiing to Minimize the Fire's Spread

(Posted on April 14, 2014 at 5:20 p.m.)  The Brown Fire started on U.S. Army Fort Huachuca on April 13 and burned onto the Coronado National Forest at approximately 11am on April 14.

 

The Brown Fire is burning in Garden Canyon on the north side of the Huachuca Mountains. It is human-caused under investigation and burning in a remote location. The current size is approximately 96 acres with 0% containment. The fire is burning at the upper elevations in brush and timber. No structures are threatened at this time.

 

Resources assigned include:

·        2 hotshot crews on scene - Ironwood IHC & Silver City IHC (3 additional hotshot crews enroute)

·        Coronado NF crew 5 short crew

·        2 Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs)

·        2 P2V air tankers

·        1 Very Large Air Tanker (VLAT)

·        1 Type 3 helicopter

·        1 Type 2 helicopter

·        1 one Type 1 helicopter enroute

·        Miscellaneous fire engines (crews supporting suppression efforts)

·        Miscellaneous overhead

 

Air tankers have been dropping retardant and helicopters have been dropping buckets of water on the fire to try to minimize the fire's spread.

 

Division Supervisors and Crew Supervisors continue to assess the fire to determine the best strategy.

 

(Source:  Coronado National Forest)

Coronado National Forest, Brown Fire, Sierra Vista
4/14/2014 4:54 PMBrown Fire Burning on Coronado National Forest; Supervisors Assessing Fire Strategy

(Posted on April 14, 2014 at 4:55 p.m.)  The Brown Fire is burning in Garden Canyon on the north side of the Huachuca Mountains on the Sierra Vista Ranger District Coronado National Forest. It is human-caused under investigation and burning in a remote location. The current size is approximately 96 acres with 0% containment. The fire is burning at the upper elevations in brush and timber. No structures are threatened at this time.

 

Resouces assigned include:

·        1 hotshot crew on scene (4 additional hotshot crews enroute)

·        Coronado NF crew 5 short crew

·        2 Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs)

·        2 P2V air tankers

·        1 Very Large Air Tanker (VLAT)

·        3 Type 2 and 3 helicopters ( one Type 1 helicopter enroute)

·        Miscellaneous fire engines (crews supporting suppression efforts)

·        Miscellaneous overhead

 

Division Supervisors and Crew Supervisors are assessing the fire to determine a strategy

 

(Source:  Coronado National Forest)

Coronado National Forest, Brown Fire, Sierra Vista
4/14/2014 10:52 AMBrown Fire Update: 25 acres burned

(Posted on April 14, 2014 at 10:50 a.m.) The Brown Fire located in Garden Canyon is burning on the north side of the Huachuca Mountains at the upper elevations in brush and timber.

It has burned 25 acres and has zero percent containment. On April 13 air tankers dropping fire retardant and helicopters dropping water were utilized to restrict the spread.  Windy conditions complicated the process.

Today helicopters are shuttling firefighters to the fire, and will resume bucket drops to restrict fire spread, cool hot spots, and restrict spread of the fire.

The strategy for this operation period is to stop and hold the fire at ridgetops, and burn out below them, to prevent further fire spread.

Air tankers drop retardant to restrict fire spread and support firefighters cutting fireline on the ground.

Resources Assigned:

Firefighters:  Three crews totaling 50 firefighters

 Engines:  miscellaneous, crews providing support

 Air Tankers: 2 (1 large airtanker/P2V, 1 very large air tanker/DC-10)

 Helicopters:  3 (1 small, 1 medium, 1 large/skycrane)

 Miscellaneous Overhead

For further information on this incident please visit inciweb.nwcg.gov

 (Source: Coronado National Forest)

 

 

Coronado National Forest, Brown Fire
4/14/2014 8:58 AMOfficials Expect 100 Percent Containment on Fisher Fire Tonight

(Posted April, 14, 2014, at 9:00 a.m.)The Fisher Fire transitioned to a Type 4 incident at 6 a.m. this morning, down-sizing to local resources as crews begin to demobilize and prepare for other assignments.

Yesterday, firefighters patrolled the fire's perimeter gridding for smokes and hot spots. The fire, held at 175 acres, is currently 75 percent contained. In spite of northeasterly winds gusting up to 30 mph today, full containment is expected this evening. Temperatures range from 50 to 60 degrees with a low relative humidity of 8 to 13 percent

The public should remain aware of area closures around the vicinity of the fire which include some of the trail system.

Safety is still a big concern with steep terrain, rolling rocks, and snags; no injuries have been reported. Firefighting is an inherently dangerous occupation and wildland fire management agencies are deeply committed to learning from past accidents and tragedies, working together to do everything we can to prevent similar incidents from happening in the future.

Fisher Fire Summary
Date of Detection: April 11, 2014
Cause: Confirmed human-caused, specific cause undetermined; investigation ongoing.
Size: 175 acres
Containment: 75 percent; 100 percent expected by evening.
Location: Near Fisher Point in Walnut Canyon; approx. 5 miles SE of Flagstaff
Agency: USDA Forest Service
Resources: 4 crews, engines, water tenders, and various fire personnel.

(source: Coconino National Forest)

Fisher Fire, Coconino National Forest, wildfire, Flagstaff, Walnut Canyon
4/13/2014 6:49 PMFisher Fire Nears Containment; Crews Held Fire Size Despite Winds

(Posted on April 13, 2014 at 6:50 p.m.)  Firefighters had a quiet day on the Fisher Fire as they patrolled the fire’s perimeter gridding for smokes and hot spots.  The fire, held to 175 acres, is at 75% containment.  Safety was a big concern today with steep terrain, rolling rocks, and snags; no injuries were reported. 

 

Westerly winds increased in strength early in the afternoon though were not a factor in fire activity.  The National Weather Service issued a red flag warning today that is still in effect until 8:00 p.m. MST due to strong winds and a low relative humidity. 

 

On Monday, firefighters will continue to seek out hot spots and mop up deeper into the interior of the perimeter; some resources will begin to demobilize.  The weather is expected to see temperatures range from 53- 63 degrees with a low relative humidity between 8-13%, and winds with gusts up to 25 mph. 

 

The public should remain aware of area closures around the vicinity of the fire which include some of the trail system. 

 

Forest visitors should be aware of any fire restrictions or closures before they go camping or recreating, but also keep in mind that there is one fire regulation that never expires and is always enforced—your campfire must be out cold-to-the-touch before leaving your campsite.

 

FISHER FIRE SUMMARY

DATE OF DETECTION:  April 11, 2014

CAUSE:  Confirmed human-caused, specific cause undetermined; investigation ongoing.

CURRENT SIZE:  175 acres

CONTAINMENT:  75%

LOCATION:  Near Fisher Point in Walnut Canyon; approx. 5 miles SE of Flagstaff

AGENCY:  USDA Forest Service

RESOURCES:  7 Hotshot Crews, 3 Type Two Crews, 2 dozers, 5 water tenders, 1 lead plane, 1 Air Attack, 1Type 1 and 1 Type 3 helicopter, 10 engines, and numerous fire personnel.

 

 

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)

Coconino National Forest, Fisher Fire
4/13/2014 8:31 AMFisher Fire Update; Crews Continue Working in Steep Terrain
(Posted on April 13, 2014 at 8:35 a.m.) The Fisher Fire, reported at 3:00 p.m. on April 11th, is located near Fisher Point in Walnut Canyon approx. five miles southeast of Flagstaff in the vicinity of the Fisher Fire from last year.
 
The fire remains at 175 acres and is 50% contained. Today, crews will grid and mop up as topography and fuel conditions allow. Terrain is steep with rolling rocks and snags. No growth was reported on the fire and all lines held. No structures are threatened.
 
Today, temperatures today could reach 71 degrees with winds becoming westerly and increasing in strength with possible 45 mph gusts this afternoon; the relative humidity is forecast between 10-15%. The National Weather Service has issued a red flag warning for today in effect from noon to 8:00 p.m. MST due to strong winds and a low relative humidity.
 
The public should remain aware of area closures around the vicinity of the fire which include some of the trail system. Reducing the risk to firefighters and the public is our first priority in every fire management activity.
 
Local, state, tribal, and Federal agencies support one another with wildfire response, including engagement in collaborative planning and the decision-making processes that take into account all lands and recognize the interdependence and statutory responsibilities among jurisdictions.
 
SUMMARY DATE OF DETECTION: April 11, 2014
CAUSE: Confirmed human-caused, specific cause undetermined; investigation ongoing.
CURRENT SIZE: 175 acres
CONTAINMENT: 50%
LOCATION: Fisher Point area, Flagstaff
AGENCY: USDA Forest Service
RESOURCES: 7 Hotshot Crews, 3 Type Two Crews, 2 dozers, 5 water tenders, 1 lead plane, 1 Air Attack, 1Type 3 helicopter, 10 engines, and numerous fire personnel.
 
(Source: Coconino National Forest)
Fisher Fire, Coconino National Forest
4/13/2014 7:48 AMRed Flag Warning in Effect Today for Kaibab and Coconino National Forests
(Posted on April 13, 2014 at 7:50 a.m.) The National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for today from noon to 8 p.m. that covers the entire Kaibab and Coconino National Forests of northern Arizona.
 
Visitors to the Kaibab and Coconino National Forests are advised to refrain from having a campfire when Red Flag Warning conditions exist. This advisory covers all campfires across the forests, including in developed campgrounds.
 
A Red Flag Warning occurs when the forecast shows strong wind and low relative humidity creating an increased potential for large fire growth. The campfire advisory remains in effect until the Red Flag Warning ends.
 
For detailed weather information including warnings issued by the National Weather Service, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/fgz/.
 
(Source: Coconino and Kaibab National Forests)
Kaibab National Forest, Coconino National Forest, Red Flag Warning
4/12/2014 7:24 PMFisher Fire Update; Crews Construct Fireline on all sides of the Fire

(Posted on April 12, 2014 at 7:25 p,m,)  The Fisher Fire, reported at 3:00 p.m. yesterday, is located near Fisher Point in Walnut Canyon approx. five miles southeast of Flagstaff in the vicinity of the Fisher Fire from last year.

 

The fire remains at 175 acres and is 50% contained. Today, crews finished construction of fireline on all sides of the fire. No growth was reported on the fire and all lines held. Firefighters are currently gridding and mopping up. Crews will be pulling off the fire for the evening. No structures are threatened.

 

The public should remain aware of area closures around the vicinity of the fire which include some of the trail system.

 

Wildfires behave differently in areas where fuels have previously been treated. Fast moving wildfires slow down when they burn onto the footprints of past wildfires, prescribed burns, or thinned areas.

 

SUMMARY

DATE OF DETECTION: April 11, 2014

CAUSE: Under investigation

CURRENT SIZE: 175 acres

CONTAINMENT: 50%

LOCATION: Fisher Point area

AGENCY: USDA Forest Service

RESOURCES: 6 Hotshot Crews, 2 Type Two Crews, 2 bull dozers, 1 lead plane, 1 Air Attack, 1 Type 1 and 1Type 3 helicopter, 6 engines, and numerous fire personnel.

 

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)

Fisher Fire, Coconino National Forest, Walnut Canyon
4/12/2014 3:41 PM County Emergency Management Encourages Residents to Register for Emergency Notifications

(Posted on April 12, 2014 at 3:45 p.m.)  As the US Forest Service fire crews continue to battle the Fisher Fire burning southeast of Flagstaff, Coconino County Emergency Management is encouraging residents to register for its CodeRED emergency notification system.

 

CodeRED is a free service that alerts residents and businesses about time-sensitive general and emergency situations that are either imminent or occurring in their communities. The County is using the service to keep residents informed about wildfires and other emergencies, including severe weather.

 

“The Fisher Fire has provided us with a stark reminder that the fire season is already upon us,” said County Emergency Manager Robert Rowley. “It is always a great practice to be prepared for whatever emergency conditions may arise.”

 

Prior to the fire, the County had already planned to test the system on April 18 with a call to all registered phone numbers. The fully automated CodeRED system utilizes more than twice the number of phone lines than the old Ready Coconino notification system and operates significantly faster.

 

In addition, those signing up for notifications can now receive them through land-line and cell phones, text messages and/or e-mails. Users can also download the “CodeRED Mobile Alert” app to their smartphones.

 

CodeRED allows geographically based delivery, which requires a street address to ensure that information is delivered to the proper individuals in a given situation. The system works for both landline and cellphones, but both require an address so that residents receive location-specific notifications.

Those who were previously enrolled to receive notifications through Ready Coconino will have their information transferred to CodeRED. However, to receive severe weather warnings, users must create an online account and opt-in for the service.

 

“No one should assume that their information is already included to receive notifications,” Rowley said. “All county residents are encouraged to log on to ensure their information is current. If your phone number is not in our database, you will not be called.”

 

Residents are also encouraged to be prepared for any emergency by creating a “go-bag” that can be grabbed whenever needed. The bag should include:

·        First-aid kit

·        Food and water

·        Blankets

·        Medication

·        Personal hygiene items such as soap, toothbrush and toothpaste, shampoo, etc.

·        Small denominations of cash

·        A Flashlight and extra batteries

·        Copies of important documents in a waterproof, portable container

·        Tools

 

Property owners and residents should also clear any brush, weeds, pine needles and other flammable material from around their homes. For more fire home preparedness tips, visit www.firewise.org.

For reliable, up-to-date information on the Fisher Fire and future emergency situations, monitor the County’s website at www.coconino.az.gov, Facebook page at www.facebook.com/coconinocounty and Twitter page at www.twitter.com/coconinocounty.

 

For more information and to register for CodeRED and learn how to create a go-bag, visit www.coconino.az.gov/emergency or call 928-679-8311 or toll-free at 866-939-0911.

 

(Source:  Coconino County)

Coconino County Emergency Management, CodeRED, automated notification
4/12/2014 10:29 AMFisher Fire Update; Smoke Visible in the Area
(Posted on April 12, 2014 at 10:30 a.m.) The Fisher Fire, reported at 3:00 p.m. yesterday, is located near Fisher Point in Walnut Canyon approx. five miles southeast of Flagstaff in the vicinity of the Fisher Fire from last year. The fire is estimated at 125 acres.
 
The fire is burning in timber on slopes spreading to the East-Southeast away from Flagstaff. Smoke is very visible. No structures are currently threatened.
 
Due to complexity, a Type 3 team was put in place at 6:00 p.m. Friday evening. Crews are constructing dozer line, direct, and indirect line around the fire anchoring into trails, roads, and the previous Fisher Fire.
 
Today, we expect temperatures between 59 and 69 degrees, winds southwest 15-20 mph with gusts between 20 – 30 mph, and a low relative humidity around 15%. There is a chance for showers this afternoon.
 
The public should be aware there are area closures around the vicinity of the fire tomorrow which does include some of the trail system. Firefighters and public safety is the first and highest priority in every fire management activity.
 
SUMMARY
DATE OF DETECTION: April 11, 2014
CAUSE: Under investigation
CURRENT SIZE: 125 acres
CONTAINMENT: 0%
LOCATION: Fisher Point area
AGENCY: USDA Forest Service
RESOURCES: 6 Hotshot Crews, 2 Type Two Crews, 2 bull dozers, 1 lead plane, 1 type two helicopter, 6 engines and misc. fire personnel are currently on the fire line, 1 type one helicopter on order.
 
(Source: Coconino National Forest)
Coconino National Forest, Walnut Canyon, Fisher Fire
4/12/2014 5:24 AMFisher Fire Burning in Coconino National Forest

(Posted on April 12 at 5:24 a.m.)  The Fisher Fire, reported at 3:00 p.m. yesterday, is located near Fisher Point in Walnut Canyon approx. five miles southeast of Flagstaff in the vicinity of the Fisher Fire from last year.

As of 9:00 p.m. Friday, the fire is estimated at 85 acres. The fire is burning in timber on slopes spreading to the East-Southeast away from Flagstaff. Smoke is very visible. No structures are currently threatened.

Friday’s fire activity included group torching, 2 – 4 foot flame lengths on the surface, and short range spotting though fire activity has decreased into the evening. Due to complexity, a Type 3 team was in place at 6:00 p.m Friday. Crews are constructing dozer line, direct, and indirect line into the night around the head of the fire anchoring into trails, roads, and the previous Fisher Fire.

Saturday, we expect temperatures between 60 and 64 degrees, wind gusts between 20 – 25 miles per hour, and a low relative humidity around 15%. There is a chance for showers in the afternoon.

The public should be aware there will be area closures around the vicinity of the fire which does include some of the trail system. Firefighters and public safety is the first and highest priority in every fire management activity.

FIRE SUMMARY

DATE OF DETECTION: April 11, 2014

CAUSE: Under investigation

CURRENT SIZE: 85 acres

CONTAINMENT: 0%

LOCATION: Fisher Point area

AGENCY: USDA Forest Service

RESOURCES: Flagstaff Hotshots, 1 lead plane, 1 dozer, 6 engines, and misc. fire personnel are currently on the fire line. More resources are on the way.

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)

Fisher Fire, Southeast of Flagstaff, Coconino National Forest
4/11/2014 1:13 PMWildfire Information and Preparedness Meeting for Apache County Residents

(Posted on April 11, 2014 at 1:15 p.m.) Local fire departments, the U.S Forest Service, Emergency Preparedness, Public Health, ADEQ and managers of the Hazardous Fuels Reduction Grant Program will present wildfire information and preparedness at the Eagar Town Hall on April 29, 2014 at 6 p.m.

 

The main focus of the evening is the new Ready, Set, Go program, a tool to educate individuals on preparedness, situational awareness and safety. Developed as a three step process through a nation-wide discussion about how to protect homes and lives in the Wildland-Urban Interface, the Ready, Set, Go program helps increase your knowledge and ability to act safely during an emergency situation.

 

Other topics to be discussed include expected spring and summer weather conditions, fire season, fire restrictions, red flag warnings, and the Northeastern Arizona Public Information System. Managers of the Hazardous Fuels Reduction Grants Program will be discussing the benefits of the program and how to get signed up.

 

For current fire information, restrictions and red flag warnings visit www.311info.net, www.noaa.gov, www.fs.usda.gov/asnf and www.firerestrictions.us. You can also dial 311 or (928) 333-3412.  

 

Follow the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests on Twitter (@A_SNFs) for instant updates on fire restrictions, red flag warnings, prescribed fire and wildland fire.

 

(Source: Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests)

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests, Wildfire, Ready Set Go
4/9/2014 6:58 PMPrescribed Burning Planned at Tumacácori National Historical Park

(Posted on April 9, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.)  The National Park Service plans to burn several piles of woody debris at Tumacácori National Historical Park in early April.  Although the project’s target date is April 10, 2014, the piles will only be burned if and when environmental conditions are favorable and adequate fire management resources are available. 

 

The piles consist of mesquite tree branches and other brush previously thinned in the park.  This hazard fuels reduction project will reduce fuels that could feed a wildfire along the park’s western boundary.  This will reduce the threat of fire to private homes and help protect the plants, wildlife, and important cultural resources in the park.

 

The piles will be ignited by firefighters and monitored until they are completely out.  Local residents and park visitors may see open flames and/or smell smoke in the vicinity of the park during the burn.  The project is anticipated to be completed in one day.

 

For information about the national park visit our website, http://www.nps.gov/tuma, or follow us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/TumacacoriNHP).

 

For more information on the National Park Service Wildland Fire Management Program, visit http://www.nps.gov/fire. 

 

To learn how you can reduce wildfire risk on your own property, please visit http://www.firewise.org.

 

(Source:  National ParkService)

 

National Park Service, Tumacacori National Historical Park
4/7/2014 12:46 PMLion Fire on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation

(Posted on April 7, 2014 at 12:48 p.m.) The Lion Fire on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation is 60% contained as of this morning. The fire, which started on April 4, 2014 is located southeast of Whiteriver, in the Cosen Canyon area just above the Tonto Creek drainage.

The 500-acre fire has burned Ponderosa Pine with brush and grass understory. Firefighters are working on reinforcing the fire line and mopping up.

Resources on Fire:

3 Type 6 engines

1 Type 3 engine

1 short squad of 6 firefighters

Mesa Hotshots

Department of Corrections Crew

(Source: Bureau of Indian Affairs Forestry & Wildland Fire Management)

 

Lion Fire, Fort Apache Indian Reservation Bureau of Indian Affairs
4/1/2014 12:06 PMClifton Ranger District plans Mesa Re-Entry Prescribed Burn

(Posted on April 1, 2014 at 12:05 p.m.) The Clifton Ranger District on the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests plans to begin the Mesa Re-Entry prescribed burn on April 3. The project will take two to three weeks to complete, depending on weather conditions.

The 7,885-acre burn area is bounded to the north and west by the Pine Flats Road (FR 515), to the east by the Sheep Wash Drainage, and to the south by the Upper Eagle Creek Road (FR 217).

Fuel types include grass, juniper, oak, pinyon pine, ponderosa pine, and some areas of juniper slash from thinning projects. The burn is intended to reduce canopy cover by 20-40 percent and maintain areas of reduced canopy cover achieved in past prescribed burns. It will also reduce juniper re-sprouts and enhance mule deer, white-tailed deer, turkey, pronghorn antelope, and javelina habitat.

Ignitions will only occur during the week, and the burn will be monitored by crews over the weekend.

For current fire information, red flags warnings, and fire restrictions, visit www.311info.net, dial 311 or call (928) 333-3412. 

(Source: Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests)

Clifton Ranger District, Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests, Prescribed burn
3/31/2014 9:28 PMBoulder Fire Update; Firefighters Make Tremendous Progress Today

(Posted on March 31, 2014 at 9:27 p.m.)  Firefighters made tremendous progress today on the Boulder Fire, reported yesterday at 1:30 p.m.  The fire is located northeast of Flagstaff on Mt. Elden.  Cause is under investigation. 

 

The fire remains at 1 ½ acres.  Today firefighters secured the fire line and mopped up.  All resources will be off of the fire beginning this evening.  The fire reported no injuries.  The bone piling of partially burned logs will put up some residual smoke.  Tomorrow fire personnel will assess and monitor the fire.

 

This year, due to ongoing drought conditions and other factors, most national forests in the Southwest are expecting an above normal fire season.  The Forest Service will be working with our Federal, state, and local partners to ensure that proper response protocols are established to deal with these conditions.

 

This is the final news release for the Boulder Fire unless a significant change of conditions occurs.

 

Fire Summary

DATE OF DETECTION:  March 30, 2014

CAUSE:  Under investigation

CURRENT SIZE:  1 1/2 acres

CONTAINMENT:  60% contained

LOCATION:  Mt. Elden, northeast of Flagstaff

AGENCY:  USDA Forest Service

RESOURCES:  1 engine and fire personnel from Mesa Hotshots, Coconino National Forest, and Flagstaff City Fire High Angle Rescue

 

 (Source:  Coconino National Forest)

 

 

 

Coconino National Forest, Boulder Fire
3/31/2014 9:25 PMSecret Fire Approximately 75 Percent Contained

(Posted on March 31, 2014 at 9:25 p.m.)  The Secret Fire, reported at 9:00 a.m. on March 29, 2014, is located above the rim near Secret Mountain within the Secret Mountain Wilderness approximately 20 miles southwest of Flagstaff.

 

The fire remains at 6 acres in size and is 75% contained.  Today firefighters mopped up one and a half chains in around the fire (each chain equals 66 ft).  Firefighters accomplished progress despite winds.  Tomorrow the Mesa Hotshots from the Tonto National Forest and local fire personnel will continue mopping up and monitoring the perimeter for any spots.

 

Cause is under investigation.

 

With one of the largest, most diverse, best equipped, and highly trained wildfire suppression forces in the world, the Forest Service is well prepared to respond to wildfires safely and effectively.  This year, the agency has more than 10,000 firefighters, 900 engines, and hundreds of aircraft available for wildfire suppression.

 

Fire Summary

DATE OF DETECTION:  March 29, 2014

CAUSE:  Under investigation

CURRENT SIZE:  6 acres

CONTAINMENT:  75% contained

LOCATION:  20 miles southwest of Flagstaff

AGENCY:  USDA Forest Service

RESOURCES:  2 Engines, firefighters from Mesa Hotshots, and other fire personnel

 

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)

Coconino National Forest, Secret Fire
3/31/2014 1:48 PM Red Flag Warning in Effect Today for Tusayan Ranger District

(Posted on March 31, 2014 at 1:48 p.m.)  The National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for today from 1 to 7 p.m. that covers the Tusayan Ranger District of the Kaibab National Forest.

 

Visitors to the Tusayan Ranger District are advised to refrain from having a campfire when Red Flag Warning conditions exist. This advisory covers all campfires across the district, including in developed campgrounds.

 

A Red Flag Warning occurs when the forecast shows strong wind and low relative humidity creating an increased potential for large fire growth. The campfire advisory remains in effect until the Red Flag Warning ends.

 

For Kaibab National Forest alerts, visit www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/kaibab/alerts-notices. For detailed weather information including warnings issued by the National Weather Service, visit www.wrh.noaa.gov/fgz/.

 

(Source:  Kaibab National Forest)

 

Kaibab National Forest, northern AZ, Tusayan, red flag warning
3/31/2014 9:13 AMBoulder Fire near Flagstaff Update

(Posted on March 31, 2014 at 9:13 a.m.) The Boulder Fire, reported yesterday at 1:30 p.m., is located on Mt. Elden, northeast of Flagstaff.  Smoke remains visible from Flagstaff.  Cause remains unknown at this time.

The fire is estimated at 1 1/2 acres (correcting yesterday’s size of 2 acres) and is burning without much spread high on the slope contained by boulders.  The fire is burning in light brush and between downed trees left from the old Radio Fire from the seventies.  Steep terrain is a concern.  Approximately 16 fire personnel are on scene including firefighters from the Mesa Hotshots of the Tonto National Forest.  Flagstaff City Fire Department High Angle Rescue is also working with the Forest Service in the possible event of an injury.  No structures or resources are at risk at this time.  Winds will come out of the southwest this afternoon between 15 – 25 mph with relative humidity levels between 10 – 15%.  A lighter moisture pattern is predicted later this week.  

While trails currently remain open, visitors are encouraged to stay on trails and be aware of fire and firefighter activity in the surrounding area.  The public is encouraged to stay away from the immediate fire area, which is off-trail.  The terrain is steep, snags are numerous, and strong wings create an unpredictable environment.  The Mt. Elden and Dry Lake Hills area is closed year-round to camping and campfires.  After the tragic 2013 fire season, the Forest Service has redoubled our commitment to firefighter and public safety.  The agency’s goal is for every firefighter to come home safely from every wildfire assignment.  The number one consideration in all wildfire management decisions is firefighter and public safety. 

SUMMARY

DATE OF DETECTION:  March 30, 2014

CAUSE:  Unknown at this time

CURRENT SIZE:  1 1/2 acres (correcting yesterday’s size of 2 acres)

CONTAINMENT:  0% contained

LOCATION:  Mt. Elden, northeast of Flagstaff

AGENCY:  USDA Forest Service

RESOURCES:  1 engine, fire personnel from Mesa Hotshots, Coconino National Forest, and Flagstaff City Fire

(Source: Coconino National Forest)

Boulder Fire, Mount Elden, Fire northeast of Flagstaff, Coconino National Forest
3/31/2014 9:09 AMSecret Fire southwest of Flagstaff Update

(Posted on March 31, 2014 at 9:09 a.m.) The Secret Fire, reported at 9:00 a.m. on March 29, 2014, is located above the rim near Secret Mountain within the Secret Mountain Wilderness approximately 20 miles southwest of Flagstaff.

The fire remains at 6 acres in size with visible smoke and is 70% contained.  Approximately 20 Forest Service fire personnel are on scene including firefighters from the Mesa Hotshots of the Tonto National Forest.  Firefighters will patrol for spots and mop-up today. Strong and gusty southwest winds are expected this afternoon with low relative humidity levels; a chance of showers is forecast mid-week.

Cause remains unknown at this time.

High severity wildfires pose risks to lives, property, and natural and cultural resources that people need and value, such as clean, abundant water; clean air; fish and wildlife habitat; open space for recreation; and other forest products and services.  Visitors should be aware of any fire restrictions or closures before they go camping, but also keep in mind that there is one fire regulation that never expires and is always enforced—your campfire must be out cold-to-the-touch before leaving your campsite.

Fire Summary

DATE OF DETECTION:  March 29, 2014

CAUSE:  Unknown

CURRENT SIZE:  6 acres

CONTAINMENT:  70% contained

LOCATION:  20 miles southwest of Flagstaff

AGENCY:  USDA Forest Service

RESOURCES:  2 Engines, firefighters from Mesa Hotshots, and other fire personnel

(Source: Coconino National Forest)

 

Secret Fire, Coconino National Forest, Fire southwest of Flagstaff
3/30/2014 4:31 PMSecret Fire Burning Southwest of Flagstaff; Fire Officials Battling Strong Winds

(Posted on March 30, 2014 at 4:30 p.m.)  The Secret Fire, reported at 9:00 a.m. yesterday, is located above the rim near Secret Mountain within the Secret Mountain Wilderness approximately 20 miles southwest of Flagstaff.

 

The fire remains at 6 acres in size with visible smoke and is 30% contained.  Approximately 40 Forest Service fire personnel are on scene including the Mesa Hotshots from the Tonto National Forest.  Firefighters worked today on dropping snags and catching some spots thrown by the wind; a line is in place on all sides of the fire.  Firefighters experienced strong southwest winds with gusts up to 50 mph and low relative humidity levels. 

 

Cause remains unknown at this time. A red flag warning is in place. 

 

Steep slopes with heavy timber, brush, and snags present a hazardous area, safety of firefighters is critical.  Public is encouraged to stay away from the area and not risk their own safety nor the safety of firefighters.  Firefighters and public safety is the first and highest priority in every fire management activity.

 

Fire Summary

DATE OF DETECTION:  March 29, 2014

CAUSE:  Unknown

CURRENT SIZE:  6 acres

CONTAINMENT:  30% contained

LOCATION:  20 miles southwest of Flagstaff

AGENCY:  USDA Forest Service

RESOURCES:  1 Type 2 IA crew, 1 Engine, and other fire personnel

 

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)

Secret Fire, Coconino National Forest, Fire southwest of Flagstaff
3/30/2014 4:19 PMBoulder Fire on Mount Elden; Smoke Visible from Flagstaff

(Posted on March 30, 2014 at 4:20 p.m.) Crews are on scene of the Boulder Fire.  The Boulder Fire, reported today at 1:30 p.m., is located on Mount Elden, northeast of Flagstaff.  Smoke is very visible from Flagstaff. 

 

An engine is on scene and fire personnel are assessing the situation with additional firefighters en route.  The fire is estimated at 2 acres and is burning without much spread high on the slope contained by boulders.  The fire is burning in light brush and between downed trees left from the old Radio Fire from the seventies.  Strong southwest winds, low relative humidity levels, and steep terrain are a concern.  A light moisture pattern is predicted later this week. No structures or resources are at risk at this time. 

 

Cause remains unknown at this time. A red flag warning is in place.  A red flag warning means that critical fire weather conditions are either occurring or are imminent. 

 

Public is encouraged to stay away from the area.  Weather conditions are ripe for starts, please be careful when camping or recreating.  Visitors should be aware of any fire restrictions or closures before they go camping, but also keep in mind that there is one fire regulation that never expires and is always enforced—your campfire must be out cold-to-the-touch before leaving your campground. 

 

Fire Summary:

DATE OF DETECTION:  March 30, 2014

CAUSE:  Unknown at this time

CURRENT SIZE:  2 acres

CONTAINMENT:  0% contained

LOCATION:  Mount Elden, northeast of Flagstaff

AGENCY:  USDA Forest Service

RESOURCES:  1 engine, more on order

 

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)

Bolder Fire, Mount Elden, fire northeast of Flagstaff
3/30/2014 1:25 PMSecret Fire Update; Red Flag Warning in Effect

(Posted on March 30, 2014 at 1:25 p.m.) The Secret Fire, reported at 9:00 a.m. yesterday, is located above the rim near Secret Mountain within the Secret Mountain Wilderness approximately 20 miles southwest of Flagstaff.

 

The fire remains at 6 acres in size with visible smoke.  Thirty six Forest Service fire personnel are on scene including a Type 2 IA crew.  Firefighters will continue direct tactics to keep the fire from getting established on steeper slopes on the North and Northeast sides of the fire; a line is in place on all sides of the fire.  With strong southwest winds and low relative humidity levels predicted today, the fire could develop quickly and burn with high intensities.  Steep slopes with heavy timber, brush, and snags present a hazardous area, safety of firefighters is critical. 

 

Cause remains unknown at this time. A red flag warning and Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) are in place. 

 

Public is encouraged to stay away from the area and not risk their own safety and the safety of the firefighters.  Safety is not just a consideration of how we do our work; it is the essence of how we make decisions. 

 

Fire Summary

 

DATE OF DETECTION:  March 29, 2014

CAUSE:  Unknown

CURRENT SIZE:  6 acres

CONTAINMENT:  0% contained

LOCATION:  20 miles southwest of Flagstaff

AGENCY:  USDA Forest Service

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:  1 Type 2 IA crew, 1 Engine 

 

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)

Coconino National Forest, Secret Fire
3/30/2014 6:45 AMUpdate of Secret Fire; Burning Southwest of Flagstaff

(Information from March 29, 2014  at 8:00 p.m.)  Fire personnel responded to the Secret Fire. The fire, reported at 9:00 Saturday morning, is located above the rim near Secret Mountain within the Secret Mountain Wilderness approximately 20 miles southwest of Flagstaff.

 

The fire is approximately 6 acres in size with visible smoke. Fuels in the area include timber and brush; the fire is burning at a moderate rate of spread. Nineteen Forest Service fire personnel were on scene putting in a direct line around the fire and a National Park Service helicopter responded dropping buckets to keep the fire from getting to the steep, inaccessible terrain. A Type 2 IA crew will arrive on-scene Sunday to assist firefighters in controlling progression as Sunday’s forecast calls for winds around 25 mph with gusts up to 45 mph.

 

Cause is unknown at this time.

 

Visitors should be aware of any fire restrictions or closures before they go camping, but also keep in mind that there is one fire regulation that never expires and is always enforced—your campfire must be out cold-to-the-touch before leaving your campground.

 

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)

Coconino National Forest, Secret Fire, Secret Mountain
3/29/2014 3:06 PMSecret Fire Burning Southwest of Flagstaff
Posted Saturday, March 29, 2014, at 3:06 p.m.) Coconino National Forest fire personnel are on scene of the Secret Fire today.
 
The fire, reported at 9 a.m. today, is located above the rim near Secret Mountain within the Secret Mountain Wilderness, approximately 20 miles southwest of Flagstaff. The fire is approximately 4 1/2 acres in size in timber and brush. Smoke is visible from Flagstaff.
 
Fire is burning with a moderate rate of spread on all four sides. Firefighters may remain on scene overnight. The cause is unknown at this time. As warm, dry conditions return to northern Arizona, forest visitors are urged to remember campfire safety.
 
Visitors should be aware of any fire restrictions or closures before they go camping, but also keep in mind that there is one fire regulation that never expires and is always enforced—your campfire must be out cold-to-the-touch before leaving your campground.
 
Secret Fire, Flagstaff, Coconino National Forest
3/28/2014 11:41 AM Southwest Wildfire Awareness Week; Fire Officials Offer Safety Tips

(Posted on March 28, 2014 at 11:40 a.m.)   Prescott National Forest and other agencies that are a part of the Southwest Prevention and Information Committee invite you to learn more about wildfire prevention and preparedness during  Southwest Wildfire Awareness Week, March 30 – April 5, 2014. This year’s theme is “Where We Live, How We Live, Living with Wildfire.”  We want to increase awareness and promote actions that reduce the risk from wildfire to homes and communities.

 

Below are a few reminders and websites where you can get more information:

 

  • One Less Spark = One Less Wildfire. Take Smokey Bear’s Wildfire Prevention Pledge at

www.SmokeyBear.com

 

  • Wildfire season is here. Prepare. Protect. Prevail. Get Fire Adapted now at www.Fireadapted.org

 

  • Never throw a cigarette out the window of a vehicle. Use your ashtray to prevent wildfires. Learn more at www.SmokeyBear.com

 

  • Ready, Set, Go! Create a Wildfire Action Plan for Your Home. Learn more at

http://www.wildlandfirersg.org/

 

  • Maintain your spark arrestor and don’t run power equipment on windy days. Learn more at www.SmokeyBear.com

 

  • It’s not if, but when the next wildfire will threaten your community. Learn how to get Fire Adapted at www.FireAdapted.org

 

  • Protect your home from wildfire. Remove leaves and pine needles from your roof, gutters & deck. Learn more at www.Firewise.org

 

  • If your campfire is too hot to touch, it's too hot to leave. Drown, stir, and repeat until its cold. Learn more at www.SmokeyBear.com

 

  • Where We Live, How We Live…Living with Wildfire in the Southwest. Learn more at

www.FireAdapted.org

 

 

(Source:  Prescott National Forest)

 

Prescott National Forest, Wildfire Awareness Week, Smokey the Bear, Fire tips
3/25/2014 4:16 PMBlowing dust affecting travel between Phoenix, Tucson

(Posted on March 25, 2014 at 4:15 P.M.) The Arizona Department of Transportation cautions drivers to delay travel as much as possible due to blowing dust between Phoenix and Tucson.

The National Weather Service has issued high wind and blowing dust advisories for this afternoon into tonight. Interstate 10 (between Casa Grande and Phoenix) is currently affected by high winds and blowing dust.

Blowing dust can quickly result in low visibility along the highway. ADOT urges drivers to "Pull Aside, Stay Alive" when dust kicks up. Motorists are also encouraged to monitor changing weather conditions and avoid driving into dust storms.

ADOT and the Arizona Department of Public Safety recommend the following driving tips when encountering a low-visibility dust storm:

·         Avoid driving into or through a dust storm. 

·         Do not wait until poor visibility makes it difficult to safely pull off the roadway - do it as soon as possible. Completely exit the highway if you can.

·         If you encounter a dust storm, check traffic immediately around your vehicle (front, back and to the side) and begin slowing down.

·         Do not stop in a travel lane or in the emergency lane; look for a safe place to pull completely off the paved portion of the roadway.

·         Stop the vehicle in a position ensuring it is a safe distance from the main roadway and away from where other vehicles may travel.

·         Turn off all vehicle lights, including your emergency flashers.

·         Set your emergency brake and take your foot off the brake.

·         Stay in the vehicle with your seat belts buckled and wait for the storm to pass.

·         Drivers of high-profile vehicles should be especially aware of changing weather conditions and travel at reduced speeds.

·         A driver's alertness and safe driving ability is still the No. 1 factor in preventing crashes.

 ADOT, along with the Department of Public Safety and the National Weather Service, will continue to work as a public safety team to protect Arizona's drivers, and will closely monitor conditions on the highways while maintaining driver safety.

ADOT, DPS, National Weather Service and the Governor's Office of Highway Safety recently launched the "Pull Aside - Stay Alive" campaign, including television and radio public-education programs, to aid drivers who encounter dust storms. For more information on the public awareness campaign, including drivers tips, please visit PullAsideStayAlive.org.

(Source: Arizona Department of Transportation)

Arizona Department of Transportation, DPS, National Weather Service, Pull aside stay alive, dust storm, haboob
3/25/2014 9:39 AMHigh Pollution Advisory Issued for Wednesday, March 26

(Posted on March 25, 2014 at 9:40 a.m.)  The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ)  has issued a PM-10 High Pollution Advisory for Wednesday, March 26, 2014, for areas within and bordering Maricopa County. 

 

 "High Pollution Advisory" or "HPA" means the highest concentration of pollution may exceed the federal health standard. Active children, adults and people with lung disease such as asthma should reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion. Maricopa County employers enlisted in the Trip Reduction Program are asked to activate their HPA plans on high pollution advisory days.   

 

The Phoenix Metro-area Air Quality Forecast is issued to assist in the planning of work activities to help reduce local pollution levels. A recorded message of this forecast can be accessed at 602-771-2367

 

 Resources

* Ozone Fact Sheet

* Good and Bad Ozone

* Particulate Matter Fact Sheet

* Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ozone brochure

 

 (Sources: Maricopa County Air Quality Department, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality)

 

High Pollution Advisory, trouble breathing
3/25/2014 9:24 AM Fire Danger Ratings Increase Across Kaibab, Coconino National Forests and Grand Canyon National Park

(Posted on March 25, 2014 at 9:25 a.m.)  As conditions continue to dry and warm across much of northern Arizona, fire managers on the Kaibab and Coconino National Forests and Grand Canyon National Park have moved several areas into ‘High’ fire danger. Other areas remain in ‘Low’ or ‘Moderate’ fire danger due to localized moisture conditions.

 

“High” fire danger means wildfires can start easily from most causes and that small fuels (such as grasses and needles) will ignite readily. Unattended campfires and brush fires are likely to escape and spread easily.

 

Coconino National Forest:

·        Mogollon Rim Ranger District: Moderate Fire Danger

·        Flagstaff Ranger District: Moderate Fire Danger

·        Red Rock Ranger District: High Fire Danger

 

Kaibab National Forest

·        North Kaibab Ranger District: Low Fire Danger

·        Tusayan Ranger District: High Fire Danger

·        Williams Ranger District: High Fire Danger

 

Grand Canyon National Park:

·        South Rim High Fire Danger

·        North Rim Low Fire Danger

 

While there are no restrictions or closures in effect at this time, all forest and park visitors are asked to use caution with campfires and other ignition sources such as cigarettes. Likewise, communities can reduce the risk of damage from potential wildfire by becoming knowledgeable about and engaged in actions to plan and protect their homes and neighborhoods from wildfires. More information is available at www.fireadapted.org.

 

Public land users are also reminded to be aware of red flag warnings or other fire weather conditions that may exist. More information is available at http://firerestrictions.us/az/.

 

(Source: Kaibab National Forest, Coconino National Forest, Grand Canyon National Park)

 

Coconino National Forest, Kaibab National Forest, Grand Canyon National Park, Fire Danger, Fire Restrictions
3/24/2014 3:21 PMADOT prepares to open White Mountain-area roads for summer season

(Posted on March 24, 2014 at 3:23 p.m.) The Arizona Department of Transportation will reopen several roads in the White Mountains, which are closed annually for the winter season, beginning April 15.

This winter season did not have the heavy snowfall accumulations as in past winters, but ADOT still takes the time to inspect the roads for any leftover snow drifts or downed trees which have been blown into the roadway from the high winds. ADOT crews will also look to complete any road repairs which may affect traffic.

The safety of all motorists is a top priority for ADOT before allowing traffic on previously closed roads.

The highways that will reopen on April 15 are State Route 261 between Eagar and Big Lake; State Route 273 between Sunrise Park and Big Lake; and State Route 473 between State Route 260 and Hawley Lake.

ADOT encourages motorists to enjoy the mountains this summer and return home safely by observing the following tips:

·         Make sure you and your passengers are buckled in

·         Check your vehicle before you go; proper tire pressure is important

·         Be patient (don’t speed and don’t follow other vehicles too closely)

·         Get an adequate amount of sleep before your trip

·         Bring extra water and food

·         Build some extra travel time into your schedule

·         Never drink and drive

Before you leave, check for information about highway restrictions across Arizona at ADOT’s Traveler Information website, az511.gov or dial 5-1-1

(Source: Arizona Department of Transportation)

White Mountains, Arizona Department of Transportation, AZ511, driver safety
3/21/2014 4:08 PMSpring Safety Tips for Visiting National Forests

(Posted on March 21, 2014 at 4:10 p.m.)  Last weekend the White Mountains received extremely high and gusty winds, causing trees to fall throughout the area. This is only the beginning of the strong ‘spring winds’ the Mogollon Rim normally experiences from February through May.

 

When entering forested areas, it is important to be aware of hazards and have a safety plan. Familiarize yourself with the area in which you are planning to travel. Research alternate travel routes and known area hazards. Some of the hazards you could encounter in the spring are trees falling or limbs breaking off from high winds, unexpected severe storms, and wet or muddy roads.

 

On high wind days, do not travel, camp, walk or park in areas where trees may be weakened from fire, disease or erosion. High winds can even break off the top of a green tree. If possible, carry a chainsaw or handsaw in the event that you need to remove a fallen tree that may be blocking your exit. Always “Look Up, Look Down, and Look All Around.”

 

Research current and predicted weather conditions, and always be prepared for changes. Make sure you give a friend or family member detailed information on where you are going and when you are expected to return. Many areas on the forest do not have cell phone reception, so know ahead of time the closest location for help. Try to travel with a companion so if there is an emergency someone can go for help.

 

Some forest roads may be saturated due to melting snow and spring runoff. Do not enter wet areas or drive on muddy roads. This creates resource damage and could lead to you or someone else traveling behind you getting stuck. Even for a scenic drive in the woods, you should be prepared with emergency supplies and a first aid kit. Some essential emergency supplies that you should always have in your vehicle are food, warm clothing, water, a map and compass, a sleeping bag and a pocket knife. 

 

For more information on:

Forest road conditions: Call your local Ranger District

Current and expected weather visit: www.noaa.gov

Recreation safety visit: http://www.fs.fed.us/recreation/safety/safety.shtml

 

(Source:  Apache- Sitgreaves National Forests)

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests, forest safety, Mogollon Rim
3/21/2014 2:05 PMPrescribed Burns near Flagstaff Tentatively Planned for Next Week

(Posted on March 21, 2014 at 2:05 p.m.)  If conditions are favorable, fire managers on the Flagstaff Ranger District of the Coconino National Forest may conduct prescribed burns on the Mountainaire Project and the Eastside Project. Burning would take place starting Tuesday.  

 

Updates with more specific information will be sent daily – the day before the planned burn – if fire managers plan to proceed. The public can register to receive regular email notifications by choosing the “Southwestern Region” option at http://www.fs.fed.us/news/subscription. Information can also be obtained via the Prescribed Fire Hotline at 928-226-4607, our website, and Twitter at www.twitter.com/CoconinoNF.

 

General project locations:

Mountainaire Project – Located southeast of the Flagstaff Pulliam Airport, northeast of Mountainaire, between I-17 and Lake Mary Road (Forest Highway 3), off Forest Road 3E. Crews are planning to burn up to 500 acres over the course of the week, if conditions allow.

 

Eastside Project – Located south of Little America Hotel, north of the Heckethorn neighborhood, between Lake Mary Road and I-40. Crews are planning to burn up to 300 acres over the course of the week, if conditions allow.

 

Fire managers strive to minimize smoke impacts to the community by working closely with ADEQ, partners in the Ponderosa Fire Advisory Council, as well as neighboring forests to monitor air quality. In addition, fire managers try to burn when winds and other atmospheric conditions will push the majority of smoke away from homes, and try to burn larger sections at a time to ultimately limit the number of days smoke is in the air.

 

All prescribed fire activity is dependent on personnel availability, fuel conditions, weather and ventilation, and approval from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ).

 

Fire is a natural part of this ecosystem. The forest depends on low-intensity fire to reduce accumulated vegetation, enhance wildlife habitat, and recycle valuable nutrients into the soil. Fire reduces the likelihood of severe fire behavior, creating safer conditions for the community and firefighters.

 

Prescribed burns are termed such because they are conducted within a “prescription” that defines the fuel moisture levels, air temperatures, wind conditions, and relative humidity levels that are appropriate for each project.

 

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)
Coconino National Forest, Prescribed Burn, Mountainaire Project
3/14/2014 2:53 PMThe Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests Wants your Cooking and Warming Fires Dead Out

(Posted on March 14, 2014, at 2:53 p.m.) Springtime in the White Mountains has sprung, which means many more people are going to be out in the woods enjoying the beautiful, sunny, warm days. The Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests reminds visitors to always be careful with fire, especially after having an unusually dry and warm winter.

Daytime temperatures have been warm, but the nights remain cold, usually below freezing. Many visitors might feel the need to start a warming or cooking fire while recreating. If you decide to have a fire out in the woods, keep it small. Do not even attempt to have a fire on high wind days. Wind can quickly spread a fire by blowing and swirling ash and debris, making it very hard to control.

Make sure you are far enough away from overhanging branches, rotten stumps, logs and steep slopes where debris could roll downhill. Clear a ten foot diameter area around your campfire spot by removing leaves, pine needles, pine cones, grass and anything that will burn down to the dirt. Build up a small ring of rocks to create a barrier.

Once your fire is lit, NEVER leave it unattended. Be sure to have water and a shovel close by at all times. Keep an eye on the weather. If it looks like a storm is coming in, consider putting out your fire, as strong and gusty winds are usually associated with incoming storms. When you’re done with your fire, drown it with lots of water. Use a shovel to stir the ashes and water, making sure all ashes are mixed in. Then drown the ashes again with water.

If you feel heat when holding your bare hands just over the ashes, then it’s still too hot!  Do not try to touch the ashes. If you feel heat pour more water into your ring and stir it again. Once you are confident that your fire is cold and you can’t feel any more heat, disassemble your ring. Only scatter the rocks when you are confident they are also cold.

Smokey Bear says “REMEMBER: If it’s too hot to touch, it’s too hot to leave.” For more information and to take Smokey’s pledge visit www.smokeybear.com.

(Source: Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest)

Fires, Apache-Sitgreaves national forest, smokey the bear, camp fire
3/14/2014 2:40 PMWild Land Fire Awareness and Preparedness

(Posted March 14, 2014, at 2:42 p.m.) Considering the recent drought and existing dry conditions of forested areas that interface with many Northern Arizona Neighborhoods, the Coconino County Sheriff’s Office would like to remind community members of the very real potential of wild land fires that may threaten your neighborhood, your home and ultimately your personal safety. Please review the following tips that will assist you in preparing for wild land fires.

Develop a Family Evacuation Plan that answers these questions:

• How will you leave your home and your neighborhood?
• What location will you go to if you evacuate?
• What items will you have in your pre-prepared Evacuation Go Bag?
• If separated from family members how will you re-unite?


When building your Evacuation Kit or Go Bag here are some items to include:

The five Ps

• Pills - Prescription Medication/copies of Prescriptions
• Papers - Driver’s License or ID, Social Security Card, Proof of Residence, Insurance Policies, Birth/Marriage Certificates, Investment Information, Wills, Deeds, Tax Information
• Pets - Be prepared to evacuate, transport and care for pets away from the home
• Pictures - Special photos that can’t be replaced. Consider placing photos and other important papers on a computer compatible memory device.
• Personal Computers

Some Go Bag - Secondary Items you should consider:

• Radio / batteries
• First Aid Kit
• Flashlight / batteries
• Eyeglasses
• Water
• Food (non-perishable)
• Infant / Elder hygiene items
• Hygiene Items (hand sanitizer, feminine hygiene items)
• Medical equipment / devices
• Change of clothes
• Sleeping bags
• Back-up of computer files
• Pet Food / Pet Meds


Keys to surviving a natural disaster are:

• Stay Informed
• Have a Plan
• Be Ready
• Volunteer


Law enforcement agencies are responsible for carrying out the evacuation, and law enforcement agencies are responsible for the security of areas that are evacuated. These may include deputies, volunteers, and search and rescue personnel. Your local chapter of the American Red Cross is involved in setting up evacuation shelters. If you are evacuated and choose not to go to a Red Cross shelter, you are advised to contact the Red Cross to provide information about your location, in the event family or friends are trying to find you.

Remember to register your phones and email address on the Code Red emergency notification system. By doing this, you will be notified by your choice of phone call, text, or email of emergency situations. You can register by going to Coconino County’s Emergency Management website, www.coconino.az.gov/readycoconino. Click on the Code Red Banner at the bottom of the page. You also can download a free Code Red emergency notification app for android and iPhone.

(Source: Coconino County Sheriff’s Office)

wild land fire, preparedness, Evacuation plan, Coconino County Sheriff's Office, Emergency Management
3/10/2014 2:32 PMMaking Your Home Defensible from Wildfire
(Posted on March 10, 2014 at 2:35 p.m.) The White Mountains received some long anticipated much needed moisture recently, but we still need to be careful with fire. Warm daytime temperatures and high winds will dry out light fuels quickly, making it easy for fires to spread.

 

Every spring homeowners should take a proactive approach to protecting their home and property from wildfire. There are multiple ways to make your home more defensible from a wildfire; some of them are very simple. Mow your lawn, keep weeds short and remove ground litter and dead vegetation to slow the advance of a wildfire. Remove all burnable material from rain gutters where embers can get trapped. Trim tree limbs at least 10 feet from the ground to make it harder for ground fire to reach higher limbs and become a crown fire.

 

Reducing the amount of trees, vegetation, and debris a minimum of 100 feet around your home can go a long way when it comes to protecting your home from a wildfire. For more information and helpful tips visit www.firewise.org.

 

In the process of making your home and property more defensible from wildfire, you will have produced debris such as lawn and tree trimmings, yard waste, stumps, branches, and leaves. This material is known as green waste.  There are multiple locations throughout the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests that accept green waste.

 

To find a location near you, contact your local Ranger District. Some homeowners may choose to burn their yard debris, which can cause a wildfire if not done correctly. Always use caution and common sense before lighting any fire and follow these tips for safe debris burning:

 

·         Comply with local county laws; they may require a burn permit.

·         Notify your local fire department and sheriffs’ department.

·         Check the weather forecast for changing weather conditions or high winds.

·         Never burn on a windy day or red flag day.

·         Never leave your fire unattended.

·         Always keep water and hand tools available.

·         Choose a site far from power lines, overhanging limbs, buildings, automobiles and equipment.

·         If using a burn barrel, make sure it:

o    Is metal and in good condition.

o    Has vents with metal screen coverings.

o    Has a metal top screen with mesh that is one-fourth inch or finer.

o    Is stirred often and never left unattended.

 

(source: Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest)                                                                                                                                          

White mountains, wildfire, preparedness, Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest
2/10/2014 7:27 AMPile Burning Planned on the Verde Ranger District

(Posted Feb. 10, 2014, at 7:27 a.m.) Fire managers on the Verde Ranger District plan to burn Monday, Feb. 10, through Friday, Feb. 14; pending favorable weather conditions.

 

Mingus Mountain Piles--Approximately 30 Acres (T15N, R2E,S 34); 4 miles south and east of Mingus Mountain near the Mingus Springs Camp

 

All prescribed fires activity is dependent on the availability of personnel and equipment, weather, fuels and conditions that minimize smoke impacts as best as possible and approval from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality.

 

For additional prescribed fire information, call the Prescott National Forest Fire Information Hotline at (928) 777-5799 or visit http://www.fs.usda.gov/prescott.

 

(source: Prescott National Forest)

Prescott National Forest, Verde Ranger District, smoke, prescribed burn, Mingus Mountain, Mingus Springs Camp
2/3/2014 8:37 AMPile Burning Planned this Week on the Verde Ranger District

(Posted Feb. 3, 2014, at 8:37 a.m.) Fire managers on the Verde Ranger District of the Prescott National Forest (NF) plan to burn Monday, Feb. 3, through Friday, Feb. 7.  Depending on weather conditions one or both of the follow projects may occur.

 

Pronghorn Piles--Approximately 60 Acres (T11N, R4E, S17); 2 miles south of Dugas near the Aqua Fria Grasslands

 

Mingus Mountain Piles--Approximately 40 Acres (T15N, R2E, 34); 4 miles south and east of Mingus Mountain near the Mingus Springs Camp

 

All prescribed fires activity is dependent on the availability of personnel and equipment, weather, fuels and conditions that minimize smoke impacts as best as possible and approval from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality.

 

For additional prescribed fire information, call the Prescott NF Fire Information Hotline at (928) 777-5799 or visit http://www.fs.usda.gov/prescott/

 

(source: Prescott National Forest)

Prescott National Forest, Verde, Dugas, Aqua Fria Grasslands, Mingus Mountain, Mingus Springs Camp, smoke, prescribed burn
1/31/2014 11:41 AMStrong Winds, Blowing Dust Could Affect Travel Across Arizona Today

(Posted Jan. 31, 2014, at 11:41 a.m.) Strong winds predicted for today could lead to difficult driving conditions along with periods of blowing dust and low visibility on highways across much of the state, according to the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT).

 

The National Weather Service in Phoenix has issued a blowing dust advisory until 6 p.m. for parts of central Arizona, including from Phoenix to Casa Grande. Areas of blowing dust and limited visibility have already been reported along Interstate 10 near Queen Creek Road.

 

ADOT warns drivers that breezy conditions could produce dust channels, which are localized areas of blowing dust where visibility can drop to nearly zero. This kind of wind and dust can occur in dust prone areas between Phoenix and Tucson, including I-10, I-8 and State Route 347.

 

Weather officials have also issued wind advisories for parts of northeast and southeast Arizona. One advisory in place until 7 p.m. includes most of I-40 between Flagstaff and New Mexico, while a second advisory also in place until 7 p.m. includes I-10 between Willcox and New Mexico.

 

The advisories forecast winds of 20 to 35 mph with gusts to 45 mph. Winds this strong can make driving difficult, especially for high profile vehicles.

 

Drivers are advised to stay alert and look out in all directions for blowing dust, especially in desert areas. ADOT urges drivers to avoid driving into a dust storm. Motorists play an important role in their own safety when driving during a dust storm. ADOT and the Arizona Department of Public Safety recommend the following driving tips when encountering a low-visibility dust storm:

•    Avoid driving into or through a dust storm.

•    If you encounter a dust storm, check traffic immediately around your vehicle (front, back and to the side) and begin slowing down.

•    Do not wait until poor visibility makes it difficult to safely pull off the roadway — do it as soon as possible. Completely exit the highway if you can, away from where other vehicles may travel.

•    Do not stop in a travel lane or in the emergency lane; look for a safe place to pull completely off the paved portion of the roadway.

•    Turn off all vehicle lights, including your emergency flashers.

•    Set your emergency brake and take your foot off the brake.

•    Stay in the vehicle with your seatbelts buckled and wait for the storm to pass.

•    Drivers of high-profile vehicles should be especially aware of changing weather conditions and travel at reduced speeds.

•    Be aware that any storm can cause power outages to overhead roadway lighting and traffic signals. Drive with caution and treat all intersections without signals as having stop signs in all directions.

 

For more information and driving tips, please visit PullAsideStayAlive.org.For the most current information about highway closures and restrictions statewide, visit ADOT’s Travel Information Site at az511.gov or call 5-1-1.

 

(source: Arizona Department of Transportation)

ADOT, Phoenix, Casa Grande, dust, winds, Tucson, Flagstaff, Wilcox
1/29/2014 5:07 PMPark Service Officials Postpone Prescribed Burn Planned at Walnut Canyon National Monument

UPDATE (Posted Jan. 29, 2014 at 7:20 p.m.) The National Park Service has postponed a prescribed pile burn that was scheduled for Thursday, January 30, 2014 at Walnut Canyon National Monument.  Windy weather conditions preclude burning; the monument may try again next week if weather conditions are favorable.

 

(Posted Jan. 29, 2014, at 5:07 p.m.) The National Park Service will conduct a prescribed pile burn on Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014 at Walnut Canyon National Monument.

 

These piles are small hand piles which will be closely monitored to ensure good consumption and minimal smoke impact. The piles are located between the Walnut Canyon Visitor Center and U. S. Forest Road 303. The Legal is T 21 R 8 Sec 25. 

 

Smoke may be visible but Island Trail is partially open and the Rim Trail is fully open to visitors.

 

Walnut Canyon National Monument is located about 7.5 east of Flagstaff.  From Interstate 40, take exit 204 and head south.  The Visitor Center is located at the end of this 3 mile road. 

 

(source: National Park Service, Flagstaff Area National Monuments)

 

National Park Service, Walnut Canyon, Flagstaff, smoke, prescribed burn,
1/27/2014 1:15 PMPrescribed Burning Planned for Pulsifer Creek Area Southeast of Vernon

(Posted Jan. 27, 2014, at 1:15 p.m.) The Springerville Ranger District is taking advantage of warm days and cool nights that offer better ventilation for smoke for prescribed burning this week in the Pulsifer Creek area southeast of Vernon (T9N, R25E Section 3).

 

Lighter pre-spring winds and lack of snow have created a window of opportunity to secure control lines around the project area on Monday, Jan. 27. Treatment burning will continue throughout the week.

 

This burn is part of the Mineral project, a maintenance burn in open ponderosa pine and pinon-juniper with grass understories.  The Mineral project is approximately 3,400 acres in size with several smaller blocks averaging 300-600 acres in size.

 

A majority of the project area has already been treated by the White Mountain Stewardship project. The District is planning to continue work on this project through the fall of 2015. 

 

This area has major wildlife interest because it provides winter range habitat for large herds of elk and deer.  The prescribed burn should recruit more browse species (buckbrush, oak, and currant berries), reduce existing fuel hazards, and reduce the density of seedling growth within the project area.

 

All prescribed burns are approved through the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) before ignitions begin. The ADEQ monitors air quality and determines whether or not it will be a good day for smoke dispersion.

 

Breaking larger burn areas into smaller acreages often limits the amount of smoke that impacts an area. Although smoke from prescribed fire can be a nuisance, it is usually for a shorter time and considerably less smoke than wildfires produce. If you are sensitive to smoke or have respiratory problems, stay indoors if possible.

 

Crews will be on scene from the beginning of ignitions until dark monitoring fire containment.

 

For more information, contact the Springerville Ranger District at (928) 333-6200 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/asnf.

 

(source: Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest)

Springerville, Pulsifer Creek, Vernon, prescribed burn, smoke, Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest
1/27/2014 12:16 PMPrescribed Burning Planned on the Verde Ranger District

(Posted Jan., 27, 2014, at 12:16 p.m.) Fire managers on the Verde Ranger District of the Prescott National Forest (NF) plan to start ignitions on the Tex Canyon Project beginning Wednesday, Jan. 29. Burning will continue over the next two weeks.

 

Specific days to burn will be determined by current and expected weather patterns allowing fire managers to make every effort to minimize smoke impacts to nearby communities.

 

Tactics to keep smoke impacts as minimal as possible include canceling approved burns when conditions aren’t favorable, timing daytime ignitions to allow the majority of smoke time to disperse prior to settling overnight, and burning larger sections at a time when conditions are favorable to reduce the overall number of days smoke is in the area.

 

Tex Canyon Project--Approximately 3500 acres north and east of the Whitehorse Subdivision in the Dewey-Humboldt area (T14N, R2E, Sec 16, 17, 20, 21, 22, 23, 26, 27, & 34) and is designed to reduce fuel loads, return fire to its natural role in the ecosystem, reduce the potential for a damaging wildfire to impact the Whitehorse Subdivision; and in cooperation with the Arizona Game and Fish Department to improve wildlife habitat.

 

All prescribed fires activity is dependent on the availability of personnel and equipment, weather, fuels and conditions that minimize smoke impacts as best as possible and approval from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (www.azdeq.gov).

 

For additional prescribed fire information, call the Prescott NF Fire Information Hotline at (928) 777-5799 or visit http://www.fs.usda.gov/prescott.

 

(source: Prescott National Forest)

Prescott National Forest, smoke, prescribed burn, Verde Ranger District, Whitehorse Subdivision
1/25/2014 8:30 PM 2,700 Acre Grassland Restoration Prescribed Fire Planned

(Posted Jan. 25, 2014, at 8:30 p.m.) As drier conditions continue, fire managers on the Williams and Tusayan ranger districts plan various prescribed fires for the week of Jan. 26, 2014.

 

Williams Ranger District: Tentative plans starting as soon as Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, in the Government Prairie project area 8 miles northeast of Parks, Ariz. This 2,742 acre burn is designed to enhance grassland restoration and maintenance as well as benefit wildlife on the forest.

 

While smoke production from this grassland burn will likely be significant, managers hope to limit impact by conducting all burning operations over a 2 to 3 day time period. Daytime smoke is predicted to dissipate quickly with little to no overnight impacts in surrounding areas. Smoke will be highly visible from Flagstaff, Bellemont, and adjacent portions of I-40.

 

Tusayan Ranger District: Tentative plans for the week of January 26, 2014 include another 200 acres in the Flying J project area 3 miles southwest of Tusayan, Ariz. Alternate tentative plans are for 190 acres in the Tusayan East project located 3 northeast of Tusayan and east of Highway 64.

 

North Kaibab Ranger District: No prescribed fires planned at this time. All prescribed fire activity is dependent on personnel availability, weather – including winds and ventilation, and approval from the ADEQ www.azdeq.gov. Additional resources regarding smoke and air quality are available at www.wildfire.az.gov .

 

For more information, call the Fire Information Line at 928-635-8311 or visit Inciweb at inciweb.nwcg.gov

 

(source: Kaibab National Forest)

Kaibab National Forest, prescribed fire, smoke, Williams, Tusayan, Parks, Tusayan
1/22/2014 2:58 PMFlu Widespread in Arizona; Health Officials Urge Preventative Measures

(Posted on Jan. 22, 2014 at 2:58 p.m.)  After a steady increase in flu cases this year, Arizona flu activity hit widespread this week; widespread is the highest category possible. Influenza has been reported in all 15 counties. Most of the circulating flu is the 2009 H1N1 virus. Doctor and hospital visits for flu have increased over the last few weeks around the state.

 

Influenza is a serious illness with symptoms similar to the common cold. However, the flu comes on quickly and is more physically draining. For most people, the best care is to stay home, rest, and drink plenty of fluids. For others, especially those with certain medical conditions, the flu can be more severe.

 

“Some of the symptoms of the flu are very similar to those of a cold,” said Dr. Cara Christ, Chief Medical Officer for the Department of Health Services. “Some people treat the flu like it’s a cold and continue working. The truth is influenza can be fatal. If you suddenly feel sick, tired and begin coughing and sneezing, take care of yourself. Stay home and don’t spread the virus to others. If you have a hard time breathing or have chest pains, you probably need to check with your doctor or get immediate help.”

 

At this time of year, urgent care sites and hospitals are overcrowded with ill people so it is important to call your doctor first unless you are severely ill. The good news is if you haven’t been sick yet, the flu shot can still offer you protection from flu. Simple, everyday prevention measures, like washing your hands, will help stop flu and other illnesses.

 

“Obviously, the best thing you can do to protect yourself and others is to get vaccinated. With our community reaching widespread status, this means that flu is circulating and even if you get vaccinated today, it will take 2-3 weeks to build up antibodies,” said Dr. Bob England, director of the Maricopa County Department of Public Health. “In the meantime, stay home when you are sick, wash your hands frequently and make sure to cough or sneeze into your sleeve. Simple, but tried and true public health practices.”

 

While Arizona typically sees most of its flu cases in February or March, flu is unpredictable and can peak earlier or later in the season. This year, flu reports started early and have been increasing over the past few weeks. 824 cases of the 2,424 we’ve had this season were reported last week. However, because many people are not tested for the flu, those figures are just a fraction of the true number of cases.

 

Arizona is not alone in this uptick of influenza -- 40 other states reported widespread activity last week. The official Centers for Disease Control and Prevention influenza season begins in October and carries through the following September.

 

A list of flu shot providers is available at http://www.stopthespreadaz.org or by calling Community Information and Referral at 211 from anywhere in the state. For more information about influenza, go to http://www.azdhs.gov/flu or contact your health care provider or local health department.

 

(Source:  Arizona Department of Health Services, Maricopa County Public Health)

Flu, flu shots, flu symptoms, flu virus
1/19/2014 1:11 PMADEQ Issues Health Watch for Today

(Posted Jan. 19, 2014, at 1:11 p.m.) The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) has issued a PM-2.5 Health Watch for today for areas in and bordering Maricopa County.

 

ADEQ issues a watch when the highest concentration of ozone or particulate matter levels may exceed the federal health standard.

 

The Maricopa County Air Quality Department (MCAQD) has concurrently issued a No Burn day. ADEQ and MCAQD are currently conducting a “No Burn Day? Don’t Burn Wood!” campaign to make Maricopa County residents aware of the serious health threat that soot poses.

 

People with respiratory or other health problems that make them more sensitive to air pollution are advised to limit their outdoor activity.

 

Resources

·         Effects of Common Air Pollutants

·         Ozone Fact Sheet

·         Particulate Matter Fact Sheet

·         Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ozone brochure

 

(Source: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality)

ADEQ, health watch, No Burn, Maricopa, environmental quality
1/17/2014 11:34 AMPrescribed Burning Planned for Garris Knoll and Southeast of Vernon

(Posted on Jan. 17, 2013 at 11:35 a.m.)  The Springerville Ranger District is taking advantage of warm days and cool nights that offer better ventilation for smoke to begin a prescribed burn on Tuesday, January 21. The location is southeast of Vernon in the Garris Knoll and Bucklew Springs areas (T9N, R25E Sections 1-3, 5-8, and 10).

 

Garris Knoll Rx is a broadcast burn in open Ponderosa Pine with grass understory. Lighter pre-spring winds and lack of snow have created a window of opportunity to secure control lines around the project area. The total project is approximately 3,400 acres in size with several smaller blocks averaging 300-600 acres in size. A majority of the project area has already been treated by the White Mountain Stewardship project. The District is planning to work on this project through the fall of 2015.  The project area near Garris Knoll is funded in cooperation with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the Mule Deer Foundation.  The project area near Bucklew Springs off FSR61 is being funded in cooperation with the Arizona Game & Fish Department through a Habitat Partnership Committee (HPC) grant.

 

This area has major wildlife interest because it provides winter range habitat for large herds of elk and deer.  The prescribed burn should recruit more browse species (buckbrush, oak, and currant berries), reduce existing fuel hazards, and reduce the density of seedling growth within the project area.

 

All prescribed burns are approved through the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) before ignitions begin. The ADEQ monitors air quality and determines whether or not it will be a good day for smoke dispersion. Breaking larger burn areas into smaller acreages often limits the amount of smoke that impacts an area. Although smoke from prescribed fire can still be a nuisance, it is usually for a shorter time and considerably less smoke than wildfires produce. If you are sensitive to smoke or have respiratory problems, stay indoors if possible. “We expect to have very little impact to Vernon, due to our mitigation efforts like ceasing ignitions earlier in the day.  Based on past experiences, smoke typically exits to the east of Vernon from fires in this area,” according to Rusty Bigelow, Springerville District Assistant Fire Manager Officer/Fuels Specialist. Burns are generally called off if the wind direction indicates the smoke would impact Vernon.

 

Crews will be on scene from the beginning of ignitions until dark and through the weekends monitoring fire containment.

 

Questions or concerns contact the Springerville Ranger District at (928) 333-6200 or by calling 311 or 928-333-3412. Also, check out the ASNFs website at: www.fs.usda.gov/asnf

 

(Source:  Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests

 

prescribed burn, Apache-Sitgreaves, Springerville, Garris Knoll
1/16/2014 11:06 AMADEQ Issues Health Watch for Friday

(Posted Jan. 16, 2014, at 11:06 a.m.) The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) has issued a PM-2.5 Health Watch for tomorrow, Jan. 17, for areas in and bordering Maricopa County.

 

ADEQ issues a watch when the highest concentration of ozone or particulate matter levels may exceed the federal health standard.

 

The Maricopa County Air Quality Department (MCAQD) has concurrently issued a No Burn day for tomorrow. ADEQ and MCAQD are currently conducting a “No Burn Day? Don’t Burn Wood!” campaign to make Maricopa County residents aware of the serious health threat that soot poses.

 

People with respiratory or other health problems that make them more sensitive to air pollution are advised to limit their outdoor activity.

 

Resources

·         Effects of Common Air Pollutants

·         Ozone Fact Sheet

·         Particulate Matter Fact Sheet

·         Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ozone brochure

 

(Source: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality)

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, No Burn, health watch, Maricopa
1/10/2014 4:49 PMPrescribed Fire Treatment Planned for Verde Glen Area

(Posted on Jan. 10, 2014 at 4:50 p.m.)  Payson Ranger District fire specialists are planning a 1300- acre prescribed fire in the Verde Glen area Monday, Jan. 13 - Thurs., Jan. 16.

 

The planned treatment area is in the vicinity of Forest Road (FR) 32 and FR 64 (Control Rd.)

 

Residents and visitors to the area can expect to see and smell moderate amounts of smoke each day of the operation. To minimize the impact of smoke, fire experts will terminate ignitions by 3 pm daily.

 

During the day, predicted northeast winds will push smoke toward the community of Geronimo Estates.

 

Diurnal air flow in the evening hours will move residual smoke down the E. Verde Corridor and Webber Creek and will impact the communities of Whispering Pines, Geronimo Estates, Beaver Valley, Freedom Acres, Verde Glen and Rim Trail.

 

Smoke may linger in and around the treated areas thru Monday, Jan. 20.

 

When fire operations begin, signs will be posted along Control Road 64, FR 32, and other roads in the area that are likely affected by smoke. Motorists are urged to use caution while driving through these areas and to slow down for the safety of firefighters and the public.   

 

Prescribed fire treatments are always dependent on optimal weather conditions, such as fuel moisture content, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and other variables.

 

For further information, please call the Payson Ranger District at 928-474-7900.  Residents can also stay updated on prescribed fires at www.fs.usda.gov/tonto.

 

(Source:  Tonto National Forest)

Verde Glen, Tonto National Forest, prescribed burn, Control Road
1/9/2014 10:36 AMPile Burning Planned on Verde Ranger District

(January 9, 2014, at 10:36 a.m.) Fire managers on the Verde Ranger District plan to burn Monday, January 13, through Saturday, January 25. 

 

Depending on weather conditions one or all of the follow projects may occur. 

 

Pronghorn Piles: Approximately 100 Acres (T11N, R4E, S16, 17, 18); 2 miles south of Dugas near the Aqua Fria Grasslands

 

East Side Piles: Approximately 100 Acres (T13N, R4E, S5, 6); 1 mile west of I-17 near Pinto Mesa

 

Mingus Mountain Piles: Approximately 40 Acres (T15N, R2E, S27, 28, 34); 4 miles south and east of Mingus Mountain near the Mingus Springs Camp

 

Cherry Piles: Approximately 1 Acre (T14N, R3E, S17); 1 mile north of Cherry

 

 All prescribed fires activity is dependent on the availability of personnel and equipment, weather, fuels and conditions that minimize smoke impacts as best as possible, and approval from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality  

 

For additional prescribed fire information, call the Prescott National Forest Fire Information Hotline at (928) 777-5799 or visit http://www.fs.usda.gov/prescott.

 

(source: Prescott National Forest)

smoke, prescribed burn, Verde Ranger District, Prescott National Forest, Dugas, Pinto Mesa, Mingus Mountain, Cherry
1/6/2014 1:40 PMPrescribed Burn Planned at Mittry Lake Wildlife Area Next Week

(Posted Jan. 6, 2014, at 1:40 p.m.) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plans to conduct a prescribed burn on Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, in the southern portion of the Mittry Lake Wildlife. The start date and time for the burning operation depends on weather and may be delayed until appropriate conditions occur.

 

Due to public safety, Betty’s Kitchen Road will be closed to the public starting from 6 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 13, through Wednesday, Jan. 15.

 

BLM estimates it will take 2 to 3 hours to burn the 43 acres of cured Bermuda grass, with smoke visible for approximately 2 hours.   

 

The purpose of the burn is to improve the health of the Bermuda grass and to rid the area of salt cedar sprouts and weeds.  Another benefit to this project is the reduction of soil salinity so, in the future, these fields can be planted with native trees such as cottonwoods and willows to provide threatened and endangered species habitat.   

 

This burn is a joint venture with BLM, Arizona Game and Fish Department, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

 

(source: Bureau of Land Management, Yuma Field Office)

Bureau of Land Management, Mittry Lake Wildlife Area, Betty's Kitchen Road, Yuma, prescribed burn
12/31/2013 11:12 AMHigh Pollution Advisory, No Burn Day Extended Through Wednesday

(Posted Dec. 31, 2013, at 11:12 a.m.) The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) has extended today's PM-2.5 High Pollution Advisory through tomorrow, Jan. 1, for areas within and bordering Maricopa County.

 

The Maricopa County Air Quality Department has declared today and tomorrow No Burn days.

 

"High Pollution Advisory" or "HPA" means the highest concentration of pollution may exceed the federal health standard. Active children, adults and people with lung disease such as asthma should reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion. Maricopa County employers enlisted in the Trip Reduction Program are asked to activate their HPA plans on high pollution advisory days.   

 

Resources

* Ozone Fact Sheet

* Good and Bad Ozone

* Particulate Matter Fact Sheet

* Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ozone brochure

 

(Sources: Maricopa County Air Quality Department, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality)

Arizona Environmental Quality, ADEQ, high pollution advisory, No Burn Day, Maricopa
12/30/2013 11:05 AMADEQ Issues High Pollution Advisory for Tuesday

(Posted Dec. 30, 2013, at 11:05 a.m.) The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) has issued a PM-2.5 High Pollution Advisory for tomorrow, Dec. 31, for areas within and bordering Maricopa County.

 

"High Pollution Advisory" or "HPA" means the highest concentration of pollution may exceed the federal health standard. Active children, adults and people with lung disease such as asthma should reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion. Maricopa County employers enlisted in the Trip Reduction Program are asked to activate their HPA plans on high pollution advisory days.   

 

Resources

* Ozone Fact Sheet

* Good and Bad Ozone

* Particulate Matter Fact Sheet

* Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ozone brochure

 

(Sources: Maricopa County Air Quality Department, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality)

Arizona Department of Environment Quality, ADEQ, high pollution advisory, Maricopa,
12/24/2013 11:24 AMHigh Pollution Advisory Issued for Wednesday

(Posted Dec. 24, 2013, at 11:24 a.m.) The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) has issued a PM-2.5 High Pollution Advisory for tomorrow, Dec. 25, for areas within and bordering Maricopa County.

 

Consequently, the Maricopa County Air Quality Department has declared tomorrow a No Burn Day.

 

"High Pollution Advisory" or "HPA" means the highest concentration of pollution may exceed the federal health standard. Active children, adults and people with lung disease such as asthma should reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion. Maricopa County employers enlisted in the Trip Reduction Program are asked to activate their HPA plans on high pollution advisory days.   

 

Resources

* Ozone Fact Sheet

* Good and Bad Ozone

* Particulate Matter Fact Sheet

* Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ozone brochure

 

(Sources: Maricopa County Air Quality Department, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality)

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, ADEQ, high pollution advisory, ozone, Maricopa County, No Burn Day
12/23/2013 1:02 PMADEQ Issues Health Watch for Tuesday

(Posted Dec. 23, 2013, at 1:02 p.m.) The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) has issued a PM-2.5 Health Watch for tomorrow, Dec. 17, for areas in and bordering Maricopa County.

 

ADEQ issues a watch when the highest concentration of ozone or particulate matter levels may exceed the federal health standard.

 

The Maricopa County Air Quality Department has issued a No Burn day for Tuesday and will also issue a No Burn day on Christmas Day if a Health Watch or a High Pollution Advisory is called. ADEQ and MCAQD are currently conducting a “No Burn Day? Don’t Burn Wood!” campaign to make Maricopa County residents aware of the serious health threat that soot poses.

 

People with respiratory or other health problems that make them more sensitive to air pollution are advised to limit their outdoor activity.

 

Resources

·         Effects of Common Air Pollutants

·         Ozone Fact Sheet

·         Particulate Matter Fact Sheet

·         Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ozone brochure

 

(Source: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality)

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, ADEQ, health watch, ozone, Maricopa, pollution
12/20/2013 3:49 PMDPS Encourages Motorists to Drive Courteously This Holiday Season
(Posted on Dec. 20, 2013 at 3:55 p.m.) The Arizona Department of Public Safety (DPS), through its Highway Patrol Division, encourages all travelers to drive with due regard and courtesy for fellow travelers this holiday season while abiding by all traffic laws. DPS also encourages motorists to fully prepare for road trips by obtaining sufficient rest and carrying necessary supplies, including emergency food and water along with cold and wet weather clothing. Motorists should also make sure key components on their vehicle are in safe working order prior to embarking on a trip. During this holiday season, DPS will continue to measure up to our long-standing motto, “Courteous Vigilance,” by patrolling Arizona’s highways for stranded motorists, violations related to seatbelt usage, speed, impairment, and all dangerous driving behaviors. Try to limit your travels during any inclement weather that may occur and, if possible, avoid travel all together within areas affected by major storms. Recommended equipment to keep in a vehicle are snow chains, a shovel, tools, flashlights, first aid gear, and communication devices. To check the latest winter road conditions, call 5-1-1 or view the information on the web at www.az511.gov. Check with your local news outlet for updated weather conditions. (Source: Arizona Department of Public Safety)
Holiday Safety, Driving Tips, Arizona Department of Public Safety
12/19/2013 2:12 PMHigh Winds, Blowing Dust Could Affect Travel in Central Arizona

(Posted Dec. 19, 2013, at 2:12 p.m.) Strong winds forecast through this afternoon could result in blowing dust in parts of Central Arizona and limit visibility on highways, according to the Arizona Department of Transportation.

 

The National Weather Service issued a short-term forecast this afternoon that called for winds of 15-25 miles per hour with gusts in excess of 30 miles per hour near Picacho Peak State Park, which is south of Casa Grande on the Interstate 10 corridor between Phoenix and Tucson. ADOT has activated digital message boards on I-10 between Phoenix and New Mexico and on I-8, alerting drivers to high winds and possibility of blowing dust.

 

The Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) urges drivers to avoid driving into a dust storm, which can often have near-zero visibility conditions. Drivers are advised to stay alert and look out in all directions because strong winds can result in sudden periods of limited or zero visibility from blowing dust, especially in desert areas. Motorists play an important role in their own safety when driving during a dust storm.

ADOT and the Arizona Department of Public Safety (DPS) recommend the following driving tips when encountering a low-visibility dust storm:

 

·         Avoid driving into or through a dust storm.

·         If you encounter a dust storm, check traffic immediately around your vehicle (front, back and to the side) and begin slowing down.

·         Do not wait until poor visibility makes it difficult to safely pull off the roadway — do it as soon as possible. Completely exit the highway if you can, away from where other vehicles may travel.

·         Do not stop in a travel lane or in the emergency lane; look for a safe place to pull completely off the paved portion of the roadway.

·         Turn off all vehicle lights, including your emergency flashers.

·         Set your emergency brake and take your foot off the brake.

·         Stay in the vehicle with your seatbelts buckled and wait for the storm to pass.

·         Drivers of high-profile vehicles should be especially aware of changing weather conditions and travel at reduced speeds.

·         Be aware that any storm can cause power outages to overhead roadway lighting and traffic signals. Drive with caution and treat all intersections without signals as having stop signs in all directions.

 

For more information and driving tips, please visit PullAsideStayAlive.org.

For the most current information about highway closures and restrictions statewide, visit ADOT’s Travel Information Site at az511.gov or call 5-1-1.

 

(source: Arizona Department of Transportation)

Arizona Department of Transportation, Pichacho Peak, Case Grande, I-10, dust storm, Arizona Department of Public Safety, 
12/17/2013 10:30 AMPrescribed Burn Planned at Walnut Canyon National Monument

(Posted Dec. 17, 2013, at 10:30 a.m.) The National Park Service will conduct a prescribed pile burn on Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013, at Walnut Canyon National Monument.

 

These piles are small hand piles which will be closely monitored to ensure good consumption and minimal smoke impact. The piles are located between the Walnut Canyon Visitor Center and U. S. Forest Road 303. The Legal is T 21 R 8 Sec 25. 

 

Walnut Canyon National Monument is located about 7.5 east of Flagstaff.  From Interstate 40, take exit 204 and head south.  The Visitor Center is located at the end of this 3 mile road.

 

Smoke may be visible, but Island Trail is partially open and the Rim Trail is fully open to visitors.

 

(source: National Park Service)

Walnut Canyon National Monument, Flagstaff, National Park Service, Flagstaff, Island Trail, Rim Trail, smoke, prescribed burn
12/16/2013 11:57 AMADEQ Issues Health Watch for Tuesday

(Posted Dec. 16, 2013, at 11:57 a.m.) The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) has issued a PM-2.5 Health Watch for tomorrow, Dec. 17, for areas in and bordering Maricopa County.

 

ADEQ issues a watch when the highest concentration of ozone or particulate matter levels may exceed the federal health standard.

 

People with respiratory or other health problems that make them more sensitive to air pollution are advised to limit their outdoor activity.

 

Resources

·         Effects of Common Air Pollutants

·         Ozone Fact Sheet

·         Particulate Matter Fact Sheet

·         Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ozone brochure

 

(Source: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality)

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, health watch, ozone, pollution, Maricopa
12/13/2013 8:56 AMPrescribed Pile Burns Planned Next Week on Coconino National Forest
(Posted on Dec. 13, 2013 at 8:55 a.m.) Coconino National Forest fire managers are planning on conducting a prescribed burn Monday and Tuesday (Dec. 16, 17) near Mt. Elden Lookout Road, pending favorable weather conditions. Eastside Project- Rocky Ridge: 15 acres, located in between Rocky Ridge Trail and Coconino National Forest boundary, west of the entrance gate to Elden Lookout Road. Smoke and flames will be visible to residences and forest users along Elden Lookout Road, Larkspur Road and those near Rocky Ridge Trail. Mogollon Rim area: Small hand piles may also be burned along several forest roads in the Mogollon Rim area, and depending upon weather there may be a small amount of smoke visible at times in the area. All prescribed fire activity is dependent on personnel availability, weather – including winds and ventilation, and approval from the ADEQ (www.azdeq.gov). Fire managers make every effort to minimize smoke impacts to the communities while continuing to address the critical need to reduce the risk of severe wildfires around those communities. Tactics to keep smoke impacts as minimal as possible include canceling approved burns when conditions aren’t favorable, finding alternative uses for the debris in slash piles, timing daytime ignitions to allow the majority of smoke time to disperse prior to settling overnight, and burning larger sections at a time when conditions are favorable to reduce the overall number of days smoke is in the area. In addition, the Coconino National Forest coordinates prescribed fire plans with the partners of the Ponderosa Fire Advisory Council (which includes state and local fire departments), as well as neighboring forests, to reduce the impact of smoke on the communities. Prescribed fire information: • Prescribed Fire Recorded Hotline: 928-226-4607 • Coconino National Forest Website: www.fs.usda.gov/goto/coconino/rxfire • Subscribe for regular email notifications: http://www.fs.fed.us/news/subscription (choose “Southwestern Region”) • Twitter: www.twitter.com/CoconinoNF • Local Ranger Stations: Flagstaff Ranger District, 928-526-0866; Red Rock Ranger District 928-203-2900; Mogollon Rim Ranger District 928-477-2255 (Source: Coconino National Forest)
Coconino National Forest, prescribed pile burns, wildland fire, Rocky Ridge, Mogollon rim, Eldon lookout
12/11/2013 9:59 AMPrescribed Pile Burns Planned for the Remainder of the Week

(Posted Dec. 11, 2013, at 9:59 a.m.) Pending favorable conditions, fire managers on Coconino National Forest (NF) plan to conduct prescribed burns Dec. 11 to13 to finish the railroad piles project west of Flagstaff and to disperse small piles in Oak Creek Canyon north of Sedona.

 

Railroad Piles: 15 acres near the A-1 Mountain exit on 1-40 planned for Thursday. Local smoke impacts will be moderate during ignition phase, then quickly reducing with east northeast winds.

 

Oak Creek Canyon Piles: 10 acres of small piles (3 feet by 3 feet) in Oak Creek Canyon scheduled for Wednesday through Friday. Lingering smoke may be present after ignition with only light impacts expected.

 

All prescribed fire activity is dependent on personnel availability, weather – including winds and ventilation, and approval from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (www.azdeq.gov).

 

Fire managers make every effort to minimize smoke impacts to the communities while continuing to address the critical need to reduce the risk of severe wildfires around those communities.

 

Tactics to keep smoke impacts as minimal as possible include canceling approved burns when conditions aren’t favorable, finding alternative uses for the debris in slash piles, timing daytime ignitions to allow the majority of smoke time to disperse prior to settling overnight, and burning larger sections at a time when conditions are favorable to reduce the overall number of days smoke is in the area.

 

In addition, the Coconino National Forest coordinates prescribed fire plans with the partners of the Ponderosa Fire Advisory Council (which includes state and local fire departments), as well as neighboring forests, to reduce the impact of smoke on the communities.

 

For more prescribed fire information, call 928-226-4607 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/goto/coconino/rxfire.

 

(source: Coconino National Forest)

Coconino National Forest, smoke, prescribed burn, Flagstaff, Sedona, Oak Creek Canyon
12/10/2013 12:01 PMRed Cross Urges Caution Heating Homes as Weather Gets Colder
(Posted on Dec. 10, 2013 at 12:01 p.m.) As temperatures start to dip across Arizona, the American Red Cross urges families to be cautious when using space heaters and other heating sources, and to make a plan in case of a home fire. Heating sources are the leading cause of winter fires, and increase during the winter months of December, January and February. Over the past 24 hours, Grand Canyon Chapter volunteers have responded to eight home fires. Six were in Maricopa County, one was in Yuma County and one was in Mohave County. Heat sources such as space heaters, fireplaces or wood and coal stoves can pose a fire hazard. To reduce the risk of heating related fires, the Red Cross recommends keeping anything that can burn such as paper, bedding or furniture, at least three feet away from heating equipment and fireplaces and to never leave these unattended. Other concerns, especially this time of year, are candles and holiday lights. “The Grand Canyon Chapter responded to about 460 disasters last fiscal year (July 1, 2012-June 30, 2013) in our 10 counties — most of them were home fires,’’ said Natasha Holstein, Community Preparedness and Resilience Manager for the American Red Cross - Grand Canyon Chapter. “But the good news is that there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of a home fire.” The Red Cross offers the following fire prevention tips: • All heaters need space. Keep all things that can burn (paper, matches, bedding, furniture, clothing, carpets, and rugs) at least three feet away from heating equipment. • Never leave a fire in the fireplace unattended, and use a glass or metal fire screen to keep fire and embers in the fireplace. • Never use a cooking range or oven to heat your home. • Turn off portable space heaters every time you leave the room or go to sleep. • Have wood and coal stoves, fireplaces, and chimneys inspected annually by a professional, and cleaned if necessary. • If you must use a space heater, place it on a level, hard and nonflammable surface (such as ceramic tile floor), not on rugs, or carpets or near bedding or drapes. Plug power cords directly into outlets and never into an extension cord. • Do not leave candles unattended. • Never leave a cooking pot unattended. • Check smoke alarms monthly. The Red Cross depends on the generous support of Arizona residents to be ready to respond and help our neighbors who are affected by home fires. You can help your neighbors recover from disasters like home fires by making a tax-deductible donation. To make a financial donation please visit www.redcross.org, call 602-336-6660 or mail a check to American Red Cross, Grand Canyon Chapter, 6135 N. Black Canyon Hwy., Phoenix, AZ 85015. For more Red Cross fire safety and preparedness information, visit www.redcross.org/homefires. (Source: Grand Canyon Chapter of the American Red Cross)
Winter weather safety, heating tips,
12/9/2013 12:10 PMPrescribed Pile Burn Planned Near Mt. Elden Road

(Posted Dec. 9, 2013, at 12:10 p.m.) Pending favorable conditions, fire managers on the Coconino National Forest (NF) plan to conduct prescribed burns Tuesday to disperse isolated machine piles from the Snowbowl pipeline construction.

 

Breezy north winds and clearing sky conditions will help disperse smoke quickly.

 

Machine Piles: two acres, north of Flagstaff off Mount Elden Lookout Road and visible from Rocky Ridge trail, Oldham trail and Mount Elden Lookout Road.

 

All prescribed fire activity is dependent on personnel availability, weather – including winds and ventilation, and approval from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (www.azdeq.gov).

 

Fire managers make every effort to minimize smoke impacts to the communities while continuing to address the critical need to reduce the risk of severe wildfires around those communities.

 

Tactics to keep smoke impacts as minimal as possible include canceling approved burns when conditions aren’t favorable, finding alternative uses for the debris in slash piles, timing daytime ignitions to allow the majority of smoke time to disperse prior to settling overnight, and burning larger sections at a time when conditions are favorable to reduce the overall number of days smoke is in the area.

 

In addition, the Coconino NF coordinates prescribed fire plans with the partners of the Ponderosa Fire Advisory Council (which includes state and local fire departments), as well as neighboring forests, to reduce the impact of smoke on the communities.

 

For more prescribed fire information, call 928-226-4607 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/goto/coconino/rxfire.

 

(source: Coconino National Forest)

Coconino National Forest, smoke, prescribed burn, Snowbowl, Flagstaff, Mount Elden Lookout Road
12/4/2013 10:04 AMPrescribed Burns Planned for Today, Tomorrow on Coconino NF

(Posted Dec. 4, 2013, at 10:04 a.m.) Pending favorable conditions, fire managers on the Coconino National Forest (NF) plan to conduct prescribed burns in the Flagstaff area today and tomorrow.

 

Smoke from the burns is expected to disperse to the northeast. Gusty winds will assist in smoke dispersion.

 

Eastside Piles: 30 acres on the east side of Flagstaff, behind the KOA Campground and east of the Flagstaff Ranger District.

 

Railroad project: 30 acres near the A-1 Mountain exit off I-40 west of Flagstaff, north of the interstate.

 

Willard Springs: 10 acres north of Munds Park, west of I-17 off Willard Springs Road.

 

All prescribed fire activity is dependent on personnel availability, weather—including winds and ventilation—and approval from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (www.azdeq.gov).

 

Fire managers make every effort to minimize smoke impacts to the communities while continuing to address the critical need to reduce the risk of severe wildfires around those communities.

 

Tactics to keep smoke impacts as minimal as possible include canceling approved burns when conditions are not favorable, finding alternative uses for the debris in slash piles, timing daytime ignitions to allow the majority of smoke time to disperse prior to settling overnight, and burning larger sections at a time when conditions are favorable to reduce the overall number of days smoke is in the area.

 

In addition, the Coconino NF coordinates prescribed fire plans with the partners of the Ponderosa Fire Advisory Council (which includes state and local fire departments), as well as neighboring forests, to reduce the impact of smoke on the communities.

 

For additional prescribed fire information, call 928-226-4607 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/goto/coconino/rxfire.

 

(source: Coconino National Forest)

Coconino National Forest, smoke, Flagstaff, Munds Park, prescribed burn
12/3/2013 4:55 PMPrescribed Burn Planned at Walnut Canyon National Monument
(Posted on Dec. 3, 2013 at 4:55 p.m.) The National Park Service will be conducting a prescribed pile burn on Wednesday, December 4, 2013 at Walnut Canyon National Monument. These piles are small hand piles which will be closely monitored to ensure good consumption and minimal smoke impact. The piles are located between the Walnut Canyon Visitor Center and U. S. Forest Road 303. The Legal is T 21 R 8 Sec 25. Smoke may be visible but trails will remain open to visitors. If there are any questions regarding the planned ignitions please contact Chief Ranger, John Portillo at 928-526-3367. Walnut Canyon National Monument is located about 7.5 east of Flagstaff. From Interstate 40, take exit 204 and head south. The Visitor Center is located at the end of this 3 mile road. (Source: National Park Service)
Walnut Canyon National Monument, smoke, prescribed burn, Flagstaff
12/3/2013 7:51 AMKaibab National Forest Plans Pile Burns this Week

(Posted on Dec. 3, 2013 at 7:50 a.m.)  Fire managers on the Williams and North Kaibab Ranger Districts are planning various pile burns for the week of December 1, 2013. All prescribed fire activity is dependent on personnel availability, weather – including winds and ventilation, and approval from the ADEQ www.azdeq.gov. Additional resources regarding smoke and air quality are available at wildfire.az.gov . The goals of thinning and pile burning the related slash include improving forest health and reducing fire hazard on the forest.

 

Williams Ranger District: Tentative plans starting Tuesday December 3, 2013 for 110 acres of pile burning near Holden Lake approximately 2 miles northwest of Williams. Smoke will be highly visible from Williams and I-40, but should have minimal impacts.

 

Tusayan Ranger District: No prescribed fire or pile burning planned at this time.

 

North Kaibab Ranger District: Tentative plans starting Tuesday December 3, 2013 for 25-250 acres of pile burning near Timp Point between FSR 271 and FSRs 206/206B. Smoke may settle near Timp and Stina Points. Additional tentative plans for 25-50 acres of pile burning in the Jacob Lake Lodge area near Highways 67 and 89A. Very limited smoke impacts are predicted.

 

Get fire activity updates 24 hours-a-day:

Fire Information Line at 928-635-8311

Inciweb at inciweb.nwcg.gov

For additional information, please call Holly Krake (USFS), Fire Information Officer, 928-635-5653

(Source:  Kaibab National Forest)

Kaibab National Forest, Pile Burns, Williams, Tusayan, Smoke
12/2/2013 3:05 PMPrescribed Burn East of Flagstaff Planned Tuesday

(Posted on Dec. 2, 2013 at 3:05 p.m.)   Pending favorable conditions tomorrow, fire managers are planning a prescribed burn east of Flagstaff behind the KOA campground. Smoke from the burn is expected to disperse to the northeast and possibly settle over far east Flagstaff. Gusty winds will assist in smoke dispersion.

 

Eastside Piles: 30 acres on the east side of Flagstaff, behind the KOA Campground and east of the Flagstaff Ranger District. 

 

All prescribed fire activity is dependent on personnel availability, weather – including winds and ventilation, and approval from the ADEQ (www.azdeq.gov).

 

Fire managers make every effort to minimize smoke impacts to the communities while continuing to address the critical need to reduce the risk of severe wildfires around those communities. Tactics to keep smoke impacts as minimal as possible include canceling approved burns when conditions aren’t favorable, finding alternative uses for the debris in slash piles, timing daytime ignitions to allow the majority of smoke time to disperse prior to settling overnight, and burning larger sections at a time when conditions are favorable to reduce the overall number of days smoke is in the area.

 

In addition, the Coconino National Forest coordinates prescribed fire plans with the partners of the Ponderosa Fire Advisory Council (which includes state and local fire departments), as well as neighboring forests, to reduce the impact of smoke on the communities.

 

Prescribed fire information:

 

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)

Coconino National Forest, prescribed burn, KOA campground, Flagstaff
12/1/2013 11:47 AMParticulate Matter Health Watch Issued for Today and Monday in Maricopa County

(Posted on Dec. 1, 2013 at 11:47 p.m.)  The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) has issued a PM 2.5 Health Watch for today and tomorrow for areas in and bordering Maricopa County.

 

ADEQ issues a watch when the highest concentration of ozone or particulate matter levels may exceed the federal health standard.

 

People with respiratory or other health problems that make them more sensitive to air pollution are advised to limit their outdoor activity.

 

Resources

·         Effects of Common Air Pollutants

·         Ozone Fact Sheet

·         Particulate Matter Fact Sheet

·         Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ozone brochure

 

(Source:  Arizona Department of Environmental Quality)

 

health watch, ozone, Maricopa, ADEQ, pollutants
11/25/2013 1:01 PMTips for Safely Preparing and Cooking your Turkey this Holiday Season

(Posted on Nov. 25, 2013 at 1:00 p.m.)  Pinal County Environmental Health Services is offering residents some tips when preparing their turkey over this holiday season.  These tips will help the cooks of the house serve a delicious and safe turkey.

 

When preparing a turkey, be aware of the four main safety issues: thawing, preparing, stuffing, and cooking to adequate temperature.

 

Safe Thawing

Thawing turkeys must be kept at a safe temperature. The "danger zone" is between 41°F and 130°F - the temperature range where foodborne bacteria multiply rapidly. As soon as a frozen turkey starts to thaw, bacteria present become viable and can multiply. The best way to avoid a problem when thawing a turkey is to plan ahead and place the turkey in the refrigerator a few days prior to cooking. If that is not possible, other safe alternatives include thawing in cold running water, or in a microwave oven. Never thaw a turkey by leaving it out on the counter or in standing water for an extended period of time.

 

Safe Preparation

Bacteria present on raw poultry can contaminate your hands, utensils, and work surfaces as you prepare the turkey. If these areas are not cleaned thoroughly before working with other foods, bacteria from the raw turkey can then be transferred to other foods. Even if you cook the turkey, some of the other foods may not be cooked and may be contaminated. This is called cross contamination. After working with raw poultry, meat or fish always wash your hands, utensils, and work surfaces before they touch other foods. When washing your hands, be sure to use warm water, and lather with soap for 20 seconds. To be extra safe, you can sanitize utensils and surfaces with a solution of one teaspoon of household bleach per gallon of water.

 

Safe Stuffing

The safest way to prepare stuffing is to cook it outside the turkey in a casserole dish. However, many people enjoy traditional stuffing roasted inside the turkey. If you place stuffing inside the turkey, it should be cooked to the same temperature as the turkey itself. Add stuffing to the body cavity just before cooking. Ensure the stuffing is thoroughly cooked using a food thermometer. Make sure the center of the stuffing reaches a safe minimum internal temperature of 165°F. Bacteria can survive in stuffing that has not reached 165°F, possibly resulting in foodborne illness.

 

Safe Cooking

Whether you roast, fry, or smoke your turkey, the best way to ensure it is fully cooked is to check the temperature with a food thermometer. Verify the internal temperature at the center of the stuffing and meaty portion of the breast, thigh, and wing joint. The turkey and stuffing must reach a safe minimum internal temperature of 165°F. Food thermometers not only help us to ensure the food is cooked thoroughly, but also help us prevent overcooking.

 

Pinal County Environmental Health Services' mission is to ensure a safe and healthy environment for all county residents. They provide education, consultation, plan review, and inspection services to permitted facilities, including food establishments such as restaurants, bars, grocery stores, school cafeterias, day care kitchens, mobile food units, and temporary food booths at special events. They also regulate public and semipublic swimming pools, school grounds, hotels and motels. They also investigate citizen complaints of foodborne illness and environmental health nuisances. Contact them by phone at 520-866-6300 or refer to: http://pinalcountyaz.gov/Departments/EnvironmentalHealth/Pages/Home.aspx

for additional information.

 

(Source:  Pinal County Environmental Health Services)

 

 

Pinal County Environmental Services, Turkey Safety, Turkey Preparation
11/25/2013 7:58 AMKaibab National Forest Pile Burns Planned for This Week

(Posted on Nov. 25, 2013 at 8:00 a.m.)  Fire managers on the Tusayan and North Kaibab Ranger Districts are planning various pile burns for the week of November 24, 2013. All prescribed fire activity is dependent on personnel availability, weather – including winds and ventilation, and approval from the ADEQ www.azdeq.gov. Additional resources regarding smoke and air quality are available at wildfire.az.gov . The goals of thinning and pile burning the related slash include improving forest health and reducing fire hazard on the forest.

 

Williams Ranger District: No prescribed fire or pile burning planned at this time.

 

Tusayan Ranger District: Tentative plans starting Monday November 25, 2013 for 117 acres of pile burning along FSR 305 in the general Red Butte area. Very limited smoke impacts are predicted. However, downslope wind may carry some smoke to the southwest along Highway 64.

 

North Kaibab Ranger District: Tentative plans starting Monday November 25, 2013 for 25-250 acres of pile burning near Timp Point between FSR 271 and FSRs 206/206B. Smoke may settle near Timp and Stina Points. Additional tentative plans for 25-50 acres of pile burning in the Jacob Lake Lodge area near Highways 67 and 89A. Very limited smoke impacts are predicted.

 

Get fire activity updates 24 hours-a-day:

Fire Information Line at 928-635-8311

Inciweb at inciweb.nwcg.gov

 

(Source:  Kaibab National Forest)

Kaibab National Forest, Tusayan, Pile Burns
11/25/2013 7:52 AMSpringerville Ranger District Plans Two Prescribed Burns

(Posted on Nov. 25, 2013 at 7:50 a.m.)  The Springerville Ranger District will be pile burning November 25 and 26. The Springerville District is located on the Apache National Forest and is planning two separate prescribed burns.

 

The Greer Burn Pit is approximately two acres of slash and contained within an old gravel pit. The legal for the pit is T8N, R27E, Section 35. Smoke may impact Greer, South Fork, and Arizona State Highways 260 and 273.

Smoke may be present for up to one week after ignition with the most visible smoke on Monday the 25th and Tuesday the 26th.

 

The Eagar South Phone Line piles are off of Forest Service road 70A with a legal location of T8N, R28E, Section 27. These are large machine piles created after the Wallow Fire salvage. Approximately 20-30 acres of piles will be lit on Monday the 25th and Tuesday the 26th.  No ignitions will occur after Tuesday. Very little smoke impact is expected in the Eagar/Springerville area or South Fork.

 

A safety reminder for recreationists is to remember to bring water and a shovel with you if you are camping and never leave your campfire unattended. Make sure it is “cold to the touch” before you leave your campsite.

 

Note:  The public is urged to contact the Springerville Ranger District for more prescribed fire information and smoke concerns at (928) 333-6200.

 

(Source:  Apache and Sitgreaves National Forests)

 

Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest, Green Pit, Springerville
11/22/2013 7:20 PMWater Receding in Retention Areas, Washes and Roadways are Clear

(Posted on Nov. 22, 2013 at 7:20 p.m.)  This late this afternoon members of public works and the fire department assessed the City’s water retention areas, washes and roads. All of the roads are clear and the water has begun to recede in the retention areas. This is a good sign as rain is still in the forecast for the area over the weekend.

Personnel will continue to monitor the storm.

This will be the last update unless conditions change.

The fire department want to remind everyone that flash floods are still a potential hazard as this storm and large and affecting surrounding areas that feed our washes. Washes that appear dry can quickly fill with a flash flood.

• Here are a few tips of flash flood safety from the National Weather Service:
• When a flash flood warning is issued for your area or the moment you first realize that a flash flood is imminent, act quickly to save yourself. You may have only seconds.
• Get out of areas subject to flooding. This includes dips, low spots, canyons, washes, etc.
• Avoid already flooded and high velocity flow areas. Do not try to cross a flowing stream on foot where water is above your knees.
• If driving, know the depth of the water in a dip before crossing. The road bed may not be intact under the water.
• If the vehicle stalls, abandon it immediately and seek higher ground. Rapidly rising water may engulf the vehicle and its occupants and sweep them away.
• Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.
• Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams and washes, particularly during threatening conditions.
• During any flood emergency, stay tuned to your NOAA weather radio, commercial radio, or television. Information from the national weather service and disaster and emergency services may save your life.

 

(Source:  City of Maricopa Fire Department)

Maricopa, water retention, flooding, Pinal County
11/22/2013 9:27 AMWinter Recreation, Road Conditions Change Frequently; Know Before You Go

(Posted on Nov. 22, 2013 at 9:27 a.m.)  The very conditions that draw the public to the forest in the winter are also the ones that can be dangers. Forest Managers are taking several measures to provide for the safety of winter visitors and protect forest resources. The Coconino National Forest encourages snowplayers to know before you go: take the time to learn about the conditions and closures in place before heading out.

 

  • Road Closures – Many forest roads are seasonally closed due to wet or snowy conditions, especially in higher elevations. Watch for posted closure signs, call one of the district offices, or check the Coconino National Forest website at www.coconinoforest.us and click on Current Conditions in the right column. Drivers are reminded to avoid driving on saturated surfaces to prevent road damage, soil erosion and getting stuck.

 

  • Seasonal Motorized Vehicle Closures - The Wing Mountain Area off of Highway 180 is subject to a “Seasonal Motorized Wheeled Vehicle Closure” from December 1 – March 31:
    • The Wing Mountain Vehicle Closure encompasses the cross-country ski trails, the snowplay area, and includes portions of Forest Roads 222, 518, 222A and 222B beyond Wing Mountain parking area.

 

  • Snowplay Area Notices – Wing Mountain Snowplay Area will be opening as soon as snow becomes more frequent and allows for adequate coverage. The area is located 10 miles northwest of Flagstaff off of Highway 180 on Forest Road 222B. This is a fee site managed by Recreation Resource Management under a Special Use Permit with services including parking management, snowplowing, restrooms, and trash receptacles. For conditions at Wing Mountain call 602-923-3555 or visit http://www.snowplayaz.com/ .

 

·        Backcountry Permits & Travel on the San Francisco Peaks - Winter recreationists who plan on snowshoeing or skiing or snowboarding in backcountry areas should think “preparedness.” The most important aspect of preparedness is to provide someone with detailed trip plans, including exact locations and expected trip length. Avalanches are common in the San Francisco Peaks; those attempting backcountry travel should be trained in avalanche awareness and know the most current conditions. Winter backcountry travel into the Kachina Peaks Wilderness from Arizona Snowbowl or off Snowbowl Road requires a free seasonal backcountry permit. Backcountry permits will be available in Flagstaff beginning December 2 and weekdays thereafter at the Flagstaff Ranger Station, 5075 N. Highway 89, and the Coconino National Forest Supervisor’s Office, 1824 S. Thompson Street. Permits will also be available at Arizona Snowbowl’s Agassiz Lodge weekend mornings when the ski area opens. Permits will also be available at a free Avalanche Awareness Clinic on Wednesday December 11. Kachina Peaks Avalanche Center, Coconino County Search and Rescue, and the Coconino National Forest will sponsor the educational event at 6 p.m. on December 11 at the Law Enforcement Facility Auditorium at 911 E. Sawmill Road in Flagstaff. The best source for information on current snow conditions in the San Francisco Peaks backcountry is the Kachina Peaks Avalanche Center www.kachinapeaks.org.

 

For more information, contact the Coconino National Forest Supervisor’s Office at 928-527-3600 or visit www.coconinoforest.us.

 

(Source:  Coconino National Forest)

Coconino National Forest, Winter Recreation Safety
11/22/2013 9:23 AMCity Official’s Monitoring Storm; Offer Tips for Safe Driving

(Posted on Nov. 22, 2013 at 9:23 a.m.)   City officials continue to monitor the affects of the fall storm as it hits Maricopa. Public Works Department, Police Department and Fire Department members are monitoring the washes and roadways throughout the day for any rising water or flash flood conditions.

As of 8:00 this morning, only the south wash crossing in Rancho El Dorado has been closed for flooding.

Sand bags have not being distributed yet as the water retention features in the City are performing well. If conditions change, residents will be notified via Nixle, Twitter, Facebook and the local media that the sand bags are ready to be picked up.

The following are important points to remember when driving in flood conditions:

·        Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars causing loss of control and possible stalling.

·        A foot of water will float many vehicles.

·        Two feet of rushing water can carry away most vehicles including sport utility vehicles (SUV’s) and pick-ups.

·        Do not attempt to drive through a flooded road. The depth of water is not always obvious. The road bed may be washed out under the water, and you could be stranded or trapped.

·        Do not drive around a barricade. Barricades are there for your protection. Turn around and go the other way.

·        Do not try to take short cuts. They may be blocked. Stick to designated evacuation routes.

·        Be especially cautious driving at night when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.

 

You can follow the department at:
Twitter: www.twitter.com/MaricopaFirePIO
Facebook: www.facebook.com/CityofMaricopaFD
For emergency alerts sent directly to your cell phone, sign up for free at www.Nixle.com.

 

(Source:  City of Maricopa Fire Department)

Maricopa, Rancho El Dorado, Flooding, Driving Tips
11/22/2013 9:11 AMPublic Works, Emergency Management Preparing for this Weekend's Winter Storm

(Posted on Nov. 22, 2013 at 9:11 a.m.)  Pinal County's Emergency Management and Public Works Department are getting prepared for this weekend's storm that is predicted to bring one to three inches of rain to southern and central Arizona.

 

The National Weather Service's Forecast Office out of Phoenix says the winter storm will move into Arizona on Thursday night and stay in the area until Sunday. Snow levels are predicted to reach 7,000 feet in the mountains.

 

"We are being proactive," said Emergency Management Director Lou Miranda. "We will have our staffers from Emergency Management and Public Works on stand-by. The chances for flooding during this event will be likely, especially in low-lying areas. Our Public Works Department has sand bags at the various district yards for residents that need them. If there is a need for sand bags after hours, resident should call the Sheriff's Department and they will contact our Public Works Department. We are also keeping an eye on the possibility of power outages as well."

 

Miranda said that there will be a good chance of road flooding and that drivers should not take the chance to cross running washes and road crossings.

 

"It only takes about few inches of water to move a vehicle, don't take chances with your life of the lives of your loved ones. It's just not worth it," Miranda stressed.

 

(Source:  Pinal County)

Pinal County, flooding, winter storm